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Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) may lead to obesity

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  • Consumption of SSBs may lead to obesity

London, Dec 23, 2017: If you are consuming a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), stop doing so. It may make you obese or overweight, a study has confirmed.

A new review of the latest evidence on SSBs — that includes 30 new studies published between 2013 and 2015 — concludes that SSB consumption is associated with overweight and obesity.

“The evidence base linking SSBs with obesity and overweight in children and adults has grown substantially in the past three years,” said co-author Nathalie Farpour-Lambert from University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland.

“We were able to include 30 new studies not sponsored by the industry in this review, an average of 10 per year. This compares with a previous review that included 32 studies across the period 1990-2012.”

The review is published in the journal Obesity Facts.

Of these 30 studies included, 20 were in children — 17 prospective and 3 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) — and 10 were in adults — 9 prospective and 1 RCT.

Almost all (93 per cent) of the 30 studies in children and adults revealed a positive association between SSB consumption and overweight/obesity, while only one prospective cohort study in children showed no association.

The one randomised controlled trial in adults demonstrated no effect of the intervention (replacing SSBs with water and education counselling versus education counselling only). While those adults receiving the intervention lost more weight however the result was just outside statistical significance.

“By combining the already published evidence with this new research, we conclude something that in many ways should already be obvious: public health policies should aim to reduce the consumption of SSBs and encourage healthy alternatives such as water,” the researcher noted.

A total of 244,651 study participants were included in this new systematic review.

Regarding the geographical area of the studies included, 33 per cent were done in Europe, 23 per cent in the US, 17 per cent in Middle or South America, 10 per cent in Australia, 7 per cent in South Africa and the remaining 10 per cent in Iran, Thailand and Japan. (IANS)

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Exposure to Certain Disinfectants Can Cause Obesity in Kids: Research

The use of eco-friendly products may be linked to healthier overall maternal lifestyles and eating habits.

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Disinfectants
How common household cleaners could make kids overweight. Flickr

Early life exposure to certain disinfectants used at home could be making children overweight by altering the composition of their gut bacteria, suggests new research.

Babies living in households that used eco-friendly cleaners had different microbiota and were less likely to be overweight as toddlers, showed the findings published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

For the study, the researchers analysed the gut flora of 757 infants from the general population at age 3-4 months and weight at ages 1 and 3 years, looking at exposure to disinfectants, detergents and eco-friendly products used in the home.

Disinfectants
Mother’s Lifestyle Choices Linked to Obesity Risk in Adolescents. Pixabay

The researchers looked at data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort on microbes in infant fecal matter. They used World Health Organization growth charts for body mass index (BMI) scores.

Associations with altered gut flora in babies 3-4 months old were strongest for frequent use of household disinfectants such as multi-surface cleaners, which showed lower levels of Haemophilus and Clostridium bacteria but higher levels of Lachnospiraceae.

The researchers also observed an increase in Lachnospiraceae bacteria with more frequent cleaning with disinfectants.

They, however, did not find the same association with detergents or eco-friendly cleaners.

“We found that infants living in households with disinfectants being used at least weekly were twice as likely to have higher levels of the gut microbes Lachnospiraceae at age 3-4 months,” said Anita Kozyrskyj, Professor at the University of Alberta in Canada.

Disinfectants
The researchers looked at data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort on microbes in infant fecal matter. Flcikr

“When they were 3 years old, their body mass index was higher than children not exposed to heavy home use of disinfectants as an infant,” Kozyrskyj said.

“Those infants growing up in households with heavy use of eco cleaners had much lower levels of the gut microbes Enterobacteriaceae,” she said.

Also Read: Asthma Ups The Chance of Obesity: Study

Kozyrskyj suggests that the use of eco-friendly products may be linked to healthier overall maternal lifestyles and eating habits, contributing in turn to the healthier gut microbiomes and weight of their infants. (IANS)