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Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) may lead to obesity

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Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
  • Consumption of SSBs may lead to obesity

London, Dec 23, 2017: If you are consuming a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), stop doing so. It may make you obese or overweight, a study has confirmed.

A new review of the latest evidence on SSBs — that includes 30 new studies published between 2013 and 2015 — concludes that SSB consumption is associated with overweight and obesity.

“The evidence base linking SSBs with obesity and overweight in children and adults has grown substantially in the past three years,” said co-author Nathalie Farpour-Lambert from University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland.

“We were able to include 30 new studies not sponsored by the industry in this review, an average of 10 per year. This compares with a previous review that included 32 studies across the period 1990-2012.”

The review is published in the journal Obesity Facts.

Of these 30 studies included, 20 were in children — 17 prospective and 3 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) — and 10 were in adults — 9 prospective and 1 RCT.

Almost all (93 per cent) of the 30 studies in children and adults revealed a positive association between SSB consumption and overweight/obesity, while only one prospective cohort study in children showed no association.

The one randomised controlled trial in adults demonstrated no effect of the intervention (replacing SSBs with water and education counselling versus education counselling only). While those adults receiving the intervention lost more weight however the result was just outside statistical significance.

“By combining the already published evidence with this new research, we conclude something that in many ways should already be obvious: public health policies should aim to reduce the consumption of SSBs and encourage healthy alternatives such as water,” the researcher noted.

A total of 244,651 study participants were included in this new systematic review.

Regarding the geographical area of the studies included, 33 per cent were done in Europe, 23 per cent in the US, 17 per cent in Middle or South America, 10 per cent in Australia, 7 per cent in South Africa and the remaining 10 per cent in Iran, Thailand and Japan. (IANS)

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Children of Less-educated Mothers Face Higher Risk of Obesity: Study

Kids of less-educated moms at higher obesity risk

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Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion
Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion. VOA

Children of poorly-educated mothers face higher risk of obesity than those whose mothers are well-educated, suggests a new study.

For the study, published in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology journal, the researchers analysed data of 41,399 children in three European countries — Ireland, Portugal and the UK — using the mother’s highest level of education as a marker of socio-economic position.

The researchers from Trinity College, Ireland observed that children from poor socio-economic backgrounds or primary-educated backgrounds were more likely to be overweight or obese at any age as compared to children whose mothers’ had a tertiary-level education.

In Ireland, boys and girls aged 13 whose mothers had a primary-level education measured heavier as compared to children from tertiary-level (university-level) backgrounds, the study found.

obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

“This study shows that children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds gain body mass more quickly than their more advantaged peers, are more likely to be overweight or obese from pre-school age onwards, and are more likely to become obese if previously non-overweight. They are quite literally carrying a heavier burden of disease from much earlier in life,” said lead author Cathal McCrory, Research Assistant Professor at Trinity College.

“These findings reinforce the necessity of challenging the childhood obesity epidemic at early ages as these patterns are difficult to change once they have become entrenched,” McCrory added.

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The study showed while there were no differences in Body Mass Index (BMI) between children grouped by their mothers’ education in infancy, differences in BMI emerged by pre-school age (3-5 years).

“This research shows that inequalities in health and life expectancy start early in life and are well established by age five. Most children who are obese have a higher risk of being obese in adulthood with long-term health consequences,” said Richard Layte, Professor of Sociology at the varsity. (IANS)