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Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) may lead to obesity

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Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
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  • Consumption of SSBs may lead to obesity

London, Dec 23, 2017: If you are consuming a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), stop doing so. It may make you obese or overweight, a study has confirmed.

A new review of the latest evidence on SSBs — that includes 30 new studies published between 2013 and 2015 — concludes that SSB consumption is associated with overweight and obesity.

“The evidence base linking SSBs with obesity and overweight in children and adults has grown substantially in the past three years,” said co-author Nathalie Farpour-Lambert from University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland.

“We were able to include 30 new studies not sponsored by the industry in this review, an average of 10 per year. This compares with a previous review that included 32 studies across the period 1990-2012.”

The review is published in the journal Obesity Facts.

Of these 30 studies included, 20 were in children — 17 prospective and 3 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) — and 10 were in adults — 9 prospective and 1 RCT.

Almost all (93 per cent) of the 30 studies in children and adults revealed a positive association between SSB consumption and overweight/obesity, while only one prospective cohort study in children showed no association.

The one randomised controlled trial in adults demonstrated no effect of the intervention (replacing SSBs with water and education counselling versus education counselling only). While those adults receiving the intervention lost more weight however the result was just outside statistical significance.

“By combining the already published evidence with this new research, we conclude something that in many ways should already be obvious: public health policies should aim to reduce the consumption of SSBs and encourage healthy alternatives such as water,” the researcher noted.

A total of 244,651 study participants were included in this new systematic review.

Regarding the geographical area of the studies included, 33 per cent were done in Europe, 23 per cent in the US, 17 per cent in Middle or South America, 10 per cent in Australia, 7 per cent in South Africa and the remaining 10 per cent in Iran, Thailand and Japan. (IANS)

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Genes Tied to Obesity May Lower Risk of Diabetes

"Meanwhile, some lean or normal weight individuals develop diseases like Type-2 diabetes," Yaghootkar noted

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Diabetes
Poor aerobic fitness can up diabetes, heart disease risk in kids. Pixabay

Certain genetic factors may impact our body in intriguingly paradoxical ways. A team of scientists has identified 14 new genetic variations that were linked with higher Body Mass Index (BMI) but have the potential to lower risk of diabetes, lower blood pressure and lower heart disease risk.

According to researchers, it is because the location — around middle or round the liver — where surplus fat is stored could be genetically determined.

This location is more important than the amount when it comes to insulin resistance and risk of diabetes and other conditions.

“There are some genetic factors that increase obesity, but paradoxically reduce metabolic risk. It is to do with where on the body the fat is stored,” said Brunel Alex Blakemore, Professor at the Brunel University London.

The findings revealed that as they gain weight, people who carry these genetic factors store it safely under the skin, and so have less fat in their major organs such as the liver, pancreas and kidneys.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Directly under the skin is better than around the organs or especially, within the liver,” Blakemore added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes, the team examined more than 500,000 people aged between 37 and 73.

They used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of these people’s waists to match where they stored extra fat with whether they showed signs of Type-2 diabetes, heart attack and risk of stroke.

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“There are many overweight or obese individuals who do not carry the expected metabolic disease risks associated with higher BMI,” explained Hanieh Yaghootkar from the University of Exeter in Britain.

“Meanwhile, some lean or normal weight individuals develop diseases like Type-2 diabetes,” Yaghootkar noted. (IANS)