Monday January 20, 2020

Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages(SSBs) may lead to obesity

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Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
  • Consumption of SSBs may lead to obesity

London, Dec 23, 2017: If you are consuming a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), stop doing so. It may make you obese or overweight, a study has confirmed.

A new review of the latest evidence on SSBs — that includes 30 new studies published between 2013 and 2015 — concludes that SSB consumption is associated with overweight and obesity.

“The evidence base linking SSBs with obesity and overweight in children and adults has grown substantially in the past three years,” said co-author Nathalie Farpour-Lambert from University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland.

“We were able to include 30 new studies not sponsored by the industry in this review, an average of 10 per year. This compares with a previous review that included 32 studies across the period 1990-2012.”

The review is published in the journal Obesity Facts.

Of these 30 studies included, 20 were in children — 17 prospective and 3 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) — and 10 were in adults — 9 prospective and 1 RCT.

Almost all (93 per cent) of the 30 studies in children and adults revealed a positive association between SSB consumption and overweight/obesity, while only one prospective cohort study in children showed no association.

The one randomised controlled trial in adults demonstrated no effect of the intervention (replacing SSBs with water and education counselling versus education counselling only). While those adults receiving the intervention lost more weight however the result was just outside statistical significance.

“By combining the already published evidence with this new research, we conclude something that in many ways should already be obvious: public health policies should aim to reduce the consumption of SSBs and encourage healthy alternatives such as water,” the researcher noted.

A total of 244,651 study participants were included in this new systematic review.

Regarding the geographical area of the studies included, 33 per cent were done in Europe, 23 per cent in the US, 17 per cent in Middle or South America, 10 per cent in Australia, 7 per cent in South Africa and the remaining 10 per cent in Iran, Thailand and Japan. (IANS)

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Lazy Infants More Likely to Suffer From Obesity

Less active babies have higher obesity risk

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Infant obesity
Less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Researchers have revealed that less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life.

For the study, published in the journal Obesity, researchers tracked the physical activity levels of 506 infants using small ankle-worn accelerometers for four days per tracking period at ages 3, 6, 9, and 12 months.

For each tracking period after 3, average physical activity increased by about four per cent, in line with infants becoming generally more mobile and active over the course of their first year.

Among infants, higher physical activity measured by the accelerometer was associated with lower central adiposity, a measure of lower-torso fat accumulation, the study said.

Infant obesity
These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers and it may lead to obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first study to demonstrate an association over time between higher levels of objectively measured physical activity and lower central adiposity in infancy,” said study lead author Sara Benjamin-Neelon from Johns Hopkins University in US.

The study was part of a larger study of infant growth and obesity, called the Nurture study, which covered 666 mothers and their infants from the greater Durham, North Carolina, area during 2013 to 2016.

Of this group, the research team were able to get adequate accelerometer data for 506 infants.

“Some evidence suggests that the earlier you can get infants crawling and walking, and providing them with opportunities to move freely throughout the day, the more you can help protect them against later obesity,” Benjamin-Neelon said.

The study found that among the infants in the study, an increase in recorded activity by one “standard deviation”–essentially a standard proportion of the range of the data–was associated with a small but significant decrease in central adiposity.

Also Read- Males Have Higher Risk of Suffering from Cancer: Study

The researcher noted that larger, longer-term studies will be necessary to determine the sustained effect of infant physical activity, but that preventing extended periods of inactivity for infants will almost certainly be good for them.

“These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers–and perhaps we haven’t thought enough about the developmental ramifications of these types of restrictive devices,” Benjamin-Neelon concluded. (IANS)