Tuesday March 26, 2019

Controlling Diet a Remedy For Metabolic Syndrome

More than 75 percent of the participants had too low dietary fibre intake, while 65 percent had too much salt

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-friendly diets are also healthier: Study. Flickr

For those suffering from metabolic syndrome, get your diet right; else you are at a greater risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Adherence to dietary recommendations is weak among people suffering from metabolic syndrome or having increased risk for metabolic syndrome, said a new study.

“In most cases, the diet is too high in salt and saturated fat and too low in dietary fibre and unsaturated fat. Furthermore, several such people do not have a sufficient intake of vitamin D,” said the study led by the University of Eastern Finland.

The research took 175 people fulfilling at least two criteria for metabolic syndrome – for instance elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose concentration or abnormal blood lipid profile – and who were at least slightly overweight.

The researchers assessed the intake of nutrients for four days.

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Representational image. Pixabay

The diet in over 80 percent of the participants was too high in saturated fat. Correspondingly, the intake of soft, polyunsaturated fat was sufficient only in one third of the participants.

More than 75 percent of the participants had too low dietary fibre intake, while 65 percent had too much salt.

Furthermore, the intake of vitamin D was insufficient among 20 percent of the participants, and one third of men and one fourth of women consumed too much alcohol, claimed the study published in the journal “Food and Nutrition Research”.

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Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions – increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels – that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is becoming increasingly widespread, and it is associated with an elevated risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. From the viewpoint of the prevention of these diseases, adherence to dietary recommendations is of vital importance for those belonging to this risk group, the study said. (IANS)

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Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

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“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)