Tuesday March 31, 2020

Here’s How Coronavirus Affects Children

How children are vital to slowing coronavirus pandemic

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coronavirus
Amid the novel coronavirus pandemic crisis, researchers have cautioned that it is critical to understand how the virus affects kids. Pixabay

Amid the novel coronavirus pandemic crisis, researchers have cautioned that it is critical to understand how the virus affects kids in order to model the pandemic accurately, limit the disease’s spread and ensure the youngest patients get the care they need.

The commentary from researchers Steven L. Zeichner and Andrea T. Cruz, published in the journal Pediatrics, revealed a small percentage of infected children become seriously ill. Those at greatest risk include babies and preschoolers.

“Many infectious diseases affect children differently than adults and understanding those differences can yield important insights,” said study researchers from University of Virginia in the US.

“This will likely be true for COVID-19, just as it was for older infectious diseases,” they added.

coronavirus
Since many children infected with coronavirus appear to have have mild symptoms, or even no symptoms at all, it is important to practice all the social distancing, hygiene and other precautions being recommended by public health authorities to minimise transmission from children to others. Pixabay

Assessing COVID-19 risks, the researchers, noted that there are subgroups of children who appear to be at a greater risk of COVID-19 complications, particularly those who are younger, immunocompromised or have other pulmonary health problems.

However, the presence of other viral infections in up to two-thirds of childhood coronavirus cases makes it very difficult to assess the true effect of COVID-19 on children, they stated.

According to the researchers, the figure is based on prior studies of children with coronaviruses detectable in the respiratory tract.

While much remains unknown, Cruz and Zeichner cautioned that children, even asymptomatic children, could play a “major role” in disease transmission.

For example, they cited a study that found the virus remained in children’s stool for several weeks after diagnosis.

coronavirus
There are subgroups of children who appear to be at a greater risk of COVID-19 complications. Pixabay

That, combined with other routes of transmission such as nasal secretions, could pose a major challenge for schools, day care centres and the children’s families, they noted.

“Since many children infected with COVID-19 appear to have have mild symptoms, or even no symptoms at all, it is important to practice all the social distancing, hygiene and other precautions being recommended by public health authorities to minimise transmission from children to others, including family members who may be at greater risk from the infection, such as grandparents or family members with chronic medical conditions,” said Zeichner, who is working on innovative potential COVID-19 vaccines in his lab.

Also Read- Amazon and Flipkart to Take Measures to Prevent Panic Buying Amid Coronavirus Crisis

“In addition, studies of the reasons why children are affected differently than adults by the infection may yield insights that can be helpful in understanding the disease and ways to treat or prevent it,” Zeichner added. (IANS)

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Most Infants Consume Added Sugar: Study

Is your toddler consuming added sugar?

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A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume added sugars. Pixabay

Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of toddlers between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

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She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

infants sugar
Most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns. Pixabay

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

The findings showed that toddlers consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

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” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider.Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

infants sugar
Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets. Pixabay

The findings showed that infants consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Also Read- Night-Shift Workers More Prone To Get Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider. (IANS)