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Couples Who Poke Fun At Each Other Are More Likely to Stay Together

Importantly, having an aggressive sense of humour is a bad sign for the relationship in general, but it is worse if this style of humour is used in the relationship, the study noted

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Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
In stress? Remember your romantic partner and keep BP down. pixabay

Are you always in a mood to tease your better half? Then there is good news. A new study suggests that couples who poke fun at each other, indicating humour, are more likely to stay together.

The study showed that inside jokes are particularly important because they affirm ones relationship through laughter, the Daily Mail reported.

However, couples who share mean-spirited jokes with nasty jibes are unlikely to last, which indicates a problem in the relationship.

“Playfulness between romantic partners is a crucial component in bonding and establishing relational security,” said Jeffrey Hall, Associate Professor from the University of Kansas in the US.

“Particularly shared laughter is an important indicator of romantic attraction between potential mates,” Hall added.

The team examined more than 150,000 participants to determine how important humour is in a romantic relationship.

Happy couples
Happy couple, Pixabay

The results, published in the journal Personal Relationships, suggest that couples who create humour together — including inside jokes — are more likely to last.

But, this does not mean that people who are funny or can make a joke out of anything would be more lucky in love.

“If you share a sense of what’s funny, it affirms you and affirms your relationship through laughter,” Hall was quoted as saying by Daily Mail.

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However, couples should not go too far, Hall warned.

Importantly, having an aggressive sense of humour is a bad sign for the relationship in general, but it is worse if this style of humour is used in the relationship, the study noted. (IANS)

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“Foodie Call”: Study Shows Nearly 1 in 4 Women go on a Date for Grabbing a Free Meal

New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a "foodie call"

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Study says, 1 in 4 women go on date for a free meal. Pixabay

Call it new-age dating but nearly one in four women now go on a date not for the sake of romance or building a long-term relationship but grabbing a free meal, an interesting study has revealed.The new phenomenon is a “foodie call” where a person sets up a date with someone they are not romantically interested in, for the purpose of getting a free meal.

New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a “foodie call”.

The researchers from California-based Azusa Pacific University and University of California-Merced found that women who scored high on the “dark triad” of personality traits (psychopathy, Machiavellianism, narcissism), as well as expressed traditional gender role beliefs, were most likely to engage in a “foodie call” and find it acceptable.

foodie call
The new phenomenon is a “foodie call” where a person sets up a date with someone they are not romantically interested in, for the purpose of getting a free meal. Pixabay

“Several dark traits have been linked to deceptive and exploitative behaviour in romantic relationships, such as one-night stands, faking an orgasm, or sending unsolicited sexual pictures,” said Brian Collisson from Azusa Pacific University in a paper appeared in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

In the first study, 820 women were recruited. They answered a series of questions that measured their personality traits, beliefs about gender roles, and their “foodie call” history. They were also asked if they thought a “foodie call” was socially acceptable.

Twenty-three per cent of women in this first group revealed they’d engaged in a “foodie call”. “Most did so occasionally or rarely.

foodie call
New research finds that 23 to 33 per cent of women in an online study admitted they have engaged in a “foodie call”. Pixabay

Although women who had engaged in a foodie call believed it was more acceptable, most women believed foodie calls were extremely to moderately unacceptable,” the findings showed.

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The second study analyzed a similar set of questions of 357 heterosexual women and found 33 per cent had engaged in a “foodie call”. For both groups, those engaged in “foodie calls” scored higher in the “dark triad” personality traits.

The researchers also note that “foodie calls” could occur in many types of relationships, and could be perpetrated by all genders. (IANS)