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Delhi High Court Dismisses Plea Seeking Regulation on Netflix, Amazon Prime

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms "to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect"

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A gardener works on the lawns of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, India, Aug. 22, 2017. VOA

The Delhi High Court Friday dismissed a plea seeking framing of guidelines by government to regulate the functioning of online media streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

A bench of Chief Justice Rajendra Menon and Justice V K Rao rejected the petition after the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting informed it that online platforms are not required to obtain any licence from the ministry.

Central government standing counsel Vikram Jetly said the content on online platforms is not being regulated by the ministry.

The court had earlier made it clear that it was not issuing notice on the petition by NGO Justice for Rights Foundation but was only seeking the government’s response on the plea which also alleged that the online media streaming platforms show “uncertified, sexually explicit and vulgar” content.

In its plea filed through advocate Harpreet S Hora, the NGO had claimed that online media streaming platforms, that also include Hotstar, show content which is “unregulated and uncertified” for public viewing.

Netflix.

The court had asked the Centre’s counsel to seek instructions as to whether the alleged broadcasting on the online platforms is based on any licence or regulatory measures provided by government or any regulatory body.

The plea had claimed that television series like “Sacred Games”, “Game of Thrones” and “Spartacus”, shown on platforms like Netflix, contain “vulgar, profane, sexually explicit, pornographic, morally unethical and virulent” content which often “depict women in objectifying manner”.

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It had sought directions to the ministries of communication, information and broadcasting as well as law and justice to frame guidelines to regulate such platforms and the content they broadcast.

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms “to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect”. (IANS)

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Disney Announces Launch of its New Streaming Service Called Disney+ to Take Over Netflix, Hulu

Disney now is also controlling 60 per cent stake in Hulu

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DisneyLand. Image source: disneydose.com

Taking on streaming giants like Netflix and Hulu, Walt Disney Co. has announced it will launch its new streaming service called Disney+ in November, at a price of $6.99 a month.

This comes after the entertainment giant sealed the deal on its $71 billion acquisition of 21st Century Fox.

“The linchpin of Disney’s streaming strategy, Disney+ will be an ad-free subscription service anchored by programming based on Disney’s biggest franchises, including ‘Star Wars’ and Marvel Studios, as well as original programming,” The Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday.

Enchanted Castle Shanghai Disneyland. Wikimedia Commons.

In some markets it would take much longer due to several factors, including the fact that Disney is still in the process of clawing back the rights to its content, sold to other streaming platforms before it had platform aspirations of its own.

“And because the firm has had its chequebook out lately — spending $70 billion on 20th Century Fox — Disney+ will also incorporate content from recently acquired companies, such as the first 30 seasons of ‘The Simpsons’,” the BBC reported.

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Notably, with its acquisition of 21st Century Fox, The Walt Disney Company now owns Indian TV giant Star, a Mumbai-based media company with dozens of sports and entertainment channels.

Disney now is also controlling 60 per cent stake in Hulu. (IANS)