Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
As per the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the closure of heritage sites, museums, theatres and cinemas and other cultural institutions is jeopardizing funding for artists and creative industries. Pixabay

BY SIDDHI JAIN

The COVID-19 crisis is hitting the culture sector hard, says UNESCO, which has launched initiatives to support cultural industries and cultural heritage as billions of people around the world turn to culture for comfort and to overcome social isolation.


As per the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the closure of heritage sites, museums, theatres and cinemas and other cultural institutions is jeopardizing funding for artists and creative industries. It is also jeopardizing funding for the conservation of extraordinary places and the livelihoods of local communities and cultural professionals.

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

COVID-19 has put many intangible cultural heritage practices, including rituals and ceremonies, on hold, impacting communities everywhere. It has also cost many jobs and across the globe, artists, most of whom rely on ancillary activities to supplement income from their art, are now unable to make ends meet.

“The global nature of the COVID-19 crisis is a call for the international community to reinvest in international cooperation and intergovernmental dialogue. UNESCO is committed to leading a global discussion on how best to support artists and cultural institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, and ensure everyone can stay in touch with the heritage and culture that connects them to their humanity,” UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay said in a statement.


The COVID-19 crisis is hitting the culture sector hard, says UNESCO. Pixabay

“Now, more than ever, people need culture. Culture makes us resilient. It gives us hope. It reminds us that we are not alone. That is why UNESCO is doing all it can to support culture, to safeguard our heritage and empower artists and creators, now and after this crisis has passed,” said Ernesto Ottone R., Assistant UNESCO Director-General for Culture.

Please follow NewsGram on Facebook to get updates on the latest news

This week, UNESCO has launched a global social media campaign, #ShareOurHeritage to promote access to culture and education around cultural heritage during this time of mass confinement. It will also launch an online exhibition of dozens of heritage properties across the globe with technical support from Google Arts and Culture.

Also Read- The Deadly Mission of Attendees of Tablighi Jamaat

The Organisation said that it will also make available information on the impact of, and responses to, COVID-19 on World Heritage sites, which are partly or fully closed to visitors in 89 percent of countries due to the pandemic.

On April 15, UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Jean Michel Jarre, and the Organisation itself, will host the ResiliArt Debate online, bringing together artists and key industry actors to sound the alarm on COVID-19 impact on the livelihoods of artists and cultural professionals. (IANS)


Popular

Human hair wigs have several advantages over synthetic wigs

By- Digital Hub

I prefer synthetic wigs as it isn't something that I would wear all the time - just when I look different. Additionally, their ease of use is an essential factor for me. However, suppose you're looking to wear a wig for a fashionable accessory or as a way for you to show your personality. In that case, I'd recommend buying multiple synthetic wigs of various styles and colors instead of only the one human hair wig at the same amount. However, be cautious - only purchase top-quality synthetic braids that are more expensive as you might be disappointed by the new style you've chosen.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo found on Google Images

Nominated Books for Booker Prize 2021

The prestigious British-based, Booker Prize, is one of the most prestigious and acclaimed awards given annually to the best work of fiction. This award is given to a work of fiction which is primarily written in English language and published in the United Kingdom or Ireland by the writers of any nationality.

This year, six authors were nominated for their work of fiction, and the winner will be announced on the 3rd of November.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo found in Google Images

Michiyo Tsujimura performing experiments in a laboratory.

Today, 17 September,marks the 133rd birth anniversary of Michiyo Tsujimura, who was a Japanese scientist, and worked extensively on decoding the nutritional value of green tea.

Tsujimura spent her early career as a science teacher. And, in 1920, she chased her dream of becoming a scientific researcher at the Hokkaido Imperial University, where she began to analyse the nutritional properties of Japanese silkworms, in which she was very much interested.

Keep reading... Show less