Saturday July 20, 2019
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It Should Be The Responsibility of The BCCI To Unearth Cricketing Talent

Unfortunately, the player, in order to please the authorised individuals, becomes a "yes man" to all concerned. After all, "money does make the world go round."

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cricket
The Indian team under the flamboyant Virat Kohli has been an enlightened side, looking to make a mark in the history of the game. India, one of favourites to win the upcoming World Cup in England and Wales, have all the ingredients to emerge as the worthy winners. Wikimedia Commons

In cricket, more than in any other team sport, the captain plays a significant role. The onus of all the field placements, bowling changes and behaviour of the players solely rest on his/her shoulder.

The shorter the format, the more difficult it is for the captain to make plans, ascertain his thoughts and execute them. The field restriction rules amplify his problems further, and one can see a helpless leader in the T20 format hoping for divine blessings at most times.

The Indian team under the flamboyant Virat Kohli has been an enlightened side, looking to make a mark in the history of the game. India, one of favourites to win the upcoming World Cup in England and Wales, have all the ingredients to emerge as the worthy winners.

They have a strong and well-established batting and bowling line-up along with a very good fielding unit. Everything seems perfect.

However, the performance of Kohli after the series of recent losses in the shorter format against New Zealand, Australia and now in the Indian Premier League (IPL) has sparked concern amongst the millions of Indian cricket followers.

Fortunately for Kohli, he has the backing of the brilliant cricketing mind of Mahendra Singh Dhoni when playing for India. But in a crunch situation and on a world platform like the World Cup, Kohli will have to stand on his own two feet.

The two World Cup winning Indian captains — Kapil Dev and Dhoni — are both strong personalities who led through their natural cricketing instincts.

Although lots have been written on leadership and how it is important to strategise towards a goal, in cricket, however, one’s basic instinct is more important than in any other field.

cricket
They have a strong and well-established batting and bowling line-up along with a very good fielding unit. Everything seems perfect. Pixabay

I remember making fielding and bowling changes as a captain based on my natural gut instincts, which often proved successful. I was reprimanded when they failed, but I could bear with that failure rather than the other way around.

Kohli has shown that he is a decisive leader when he leads the Indian side in Test matches. After all, India are the number one side in the world. But he seems to struggle when it comes to the shorter formats. He needs to control every aspect of the game for his franchisee Royal Challengers Bangalore and use the experience of a Gary Kirsten only as a sounding board.

Dhoni is the only captain in the IPL who’s in control at the moment. Maybe his long standing equation with coach Stephen Fleming has compartmentalised his responsibilities well.

The IPL franchise owners must realise that they are not in the same league with football and rugby in Britain or basketball and baseball in the United States. The IPL is a commercially viable tournament of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) that has a two-month calendar each year and nothing more.

During the inception of the tournament, one of the criteria was to encourage cricket and develop cricket academies and centres of excellence. But domestic cricket in India already had an existing structure for it.

This, therefore, makes it unviable for the private establishments, which are direct threats to the cricket associations which are present here. The IPL team owners have gone totally awry in the recruitment of support staff and other personnel who are part and parcel of the franchises.

Each IPL team has former cricket legends as mentors, well-known international coaches, batting, fielding and bowling experts with assistants and many more helpers who accompany all of them.

Majority of them are with the teams during the initial months before the tournament and then during the event. But the senior and established players take the centre stage only a few days before the start of the IPL, as the cramped international calendar makes it impossible for them to be released. Even the Indian domestic cricketers remain busy, as with three different formats of the game, cricket has almost become a 365-day affair.

I can well imagine the confusion in the minds of a captain and a player in many of the IPL teams. The other day, while watching the IPL, I imagined myself in the position of Shreyas Iyer, the captain of Delhi Capitals.

The young captain has Ricky Ponting, Sourav Ganguly, Mohammad Kaif and Pravin Amre as advisors. All of them have been successful, not just on the field but also off it. Ganguly and Ponting were acclaimed as the best captains during their playing days.

And hailing from Mumbai, Iyer must have interacted a lot with Amre. So one can well imagine Iyer and his teammates’ dilemma as to whom to listen to. I am sure the other players in the IPL are also facing the same problem.

cricket
Each IPL team has former cricket legends as mentors, well-known international coaches, batting, fielding and bowling experts with assistants and many more helpers who accompany all of them. 
Pixabay

This kind of support staff is ideal if one has a full year programme or if its for a national side. But it is a futile exercise, as well as expenditure, for a two-month tournament which has no permanency for a junior or a senior player.

Unfortunately, the player, in order to please the authorised individuals, becomes a “yes man” to all concerned. After all, “money does make the world go round.”

Also Read: Live Football And Game Schedule on The Fscore Site

Although the IPL is great for Indian cricket, especially for the young talent to get recognised, a more compact staffing and performance-based leadership of a captain and a coach is the best way forward.

Presently, the IPL teams are functioning like the popular saying “too many cooks spoil the broth”. The franchises are not the messiahs of Indian cricket and it should be the responsibility of the BCCI to unearth cricketing talent, not theirs. (IANS)

Next Story

Top Investment Options for Beginners in India

The most important thing that guarantees high returns on your assiduous earnings is safety

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Time and Money
"Money can't buy happiness". A group of researchers believes the opposite with scientific backing. Pixabay

Investing your savings is a good idea. You just cannot keep saving money because of two main reasons.

Firstly, the savings will not grow. Most of the times they stay the same unless you count the nominal savings account your bank keeps adding half-yearly or yearly. Secondly, some need or the other arises, and you will be inclined to spend the money out of your savings than going for a loan.

We cannot stop some need. Now and then, some appliance in your house needs a repair or replacement, same goes good with your vehicles, kids, spouse and so on.

So locking away your savings so that you will not use them at convenience and letting them grow in the meanwhile is a good strategy.

Only if you knew how, when and where?

Most of us are good at working hard, slogging it out and earning the few extra bucks, but when it comes to investing and make money grow, we have neither the expertise nor the time for it.

As the famous billionaire and investor, Warren Buffet put it – “Unless you are making money while you are sleeping, you will keep working till you die”.

Safety First

Let us explore some of the investment options for people who are planning to invest.

  1. Public Provident Fund (PPF)

For a change, the Public provident fund or PPF as it is more popularly known as needs no introduction. Every employee working in a limited company or a governmental organization knows of this.

PPF is also one of the main reasons behind most of the Indians growing lazy and not trying to look for other investment options unless your wall in the above average or the top bracket. At an interest rate of 7.9% and dual contribution from the employee and the employer, PPF is the lifeline for all employees, especially if they keep contributing until retirement without withdrawing.

There is a facility to withdraw the money if you are jobless for a particular time or you can even avail three-year loans. However, mostly PPF is looked at as a post-retirement benefit than an investment option during your working years.

But an investment nonetheless.

You can save anywhere between ₹ 500 to ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year, and we all know why it is the favorite – These savings exempt from tax, However, if you choose to invest more than ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year in your PPF, the excess amount will neither earn interest or tax benefits. Minimum lock-in period is 15 years.

Fixed Deposit Scheme, India
Fixed Deposits are one of the more common and preferable investment schemes in India. Pixabay
  1. National Savings Certificate (NSC)

At an interest rate of 8% per annum, backed by the Government of India and the convenience of obtaining one (your nearby post office), a National savings certificate or an NSC can be not ignored.

Though it has a minimum lock-in period of 5 years, (the other option is 10-year lock-in period), the guaranteed good yields make it a preferred investment option by quite a few. But this is also the most ignored option by many for some reason.

Investment up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs is exempted from tax. The interest rate is revised quarterly, and the amount is compounded annually.

Another advantage is that the investments in NSC are accepted as collaterals by many banks and NBFCs (non-banking finance corporations). However, you cannot touch your amount for a minimum period of 5 years.

  1. Equity Linked Saving Scheme (ELSS)

Shorter lock-in periods and high-interest rates are the USP of the equity-linked saving schemes (ELSS).

In the ELSS, the minimum lock-in period is three years, and you can choose to make your earnings as regular dividends through the three years or receive a lump sum at once after your lock-in period ends. Therefore, this is a plan that lets you draw the amount within your investment period and gives you a chance to earn more than the rest – 15-18% returns. A near 11% interest offered by NPS (the national pension scheme) is a distant second. In addition, you do not need to invest the entire amount at once. You have an option called SIPs (systematic investment plans) by way of which you can invest as low as ₹ 500 a month.

Investments up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs are exempt from taxation, but returns are taxable. The LTCG or long-term capital gains from ELSS are taxable if they are above ₹ 1 lakh.

There is a fair amount of risk involved, and your investment may not end profitable every time. However, you can take the help of fund managers (or mutual funds) and play it safe.

  1. Recurring and Fixed deposits

Most of the nationalized and private banks offer you this facility at different interest rates and deposit lock-in periods.

In a fixed deposit (FD) scheme, you make a deposit lump sum, which will mature at the end of the pre-determined period, and if you do not have the capital to start with, you can choose a recurring deposit (RD), where you can add a fixed amount every month, which can be withdrawn at the end of the maturity period.

The interest earned with a recurring deposit may be less than that of a fixed deposit, but in case of an RD, you are creating an investment with your savings. Not all of us may have the luxury of investing a lakh or five lakh rupees to start with.

Again, investments up until ₹ 1.5 lakhs in 5 years fixed deposits are exempt from taxation, but returns are taxable. Recurring deposits and fixed deposits for a period of less than five years are not exempt from income tax.

  1. National Pension Scheme (NPS)

Many, after the introduction of 2-tier system, look upon another government-backed scheme, NPS, as a useful option.

Under the Tier I NPS, one has to contribute a minimum of ₹ 6,000 per year to keep the account active. The money cannot be withdrawn till you reach 60 years of age (partial withdrawal allowed in exceptional cases) and if you choose to exit the scheme mid-way, 80% of your savings have to be invested in an annuity plan (which will be returned to you as monthly pension payments after retirement).

The Tier II NPS is a non-retirement scheme, which is more like a savings account and allows you to withdraw money when you want. There is no lock-in period, but government employees can avail tax exemption if they lock-in their savings for a minimum period of 3 years. You need to have an active Tier I account to open a Tier II account. However, this scheme is not looked at as a long-term investment due to certain limits on investments, as you cannot invest more than 50% of your savings in stock markets, etc.

Interest rates are high at 12-14% and investments up to ₹ 1.5 lakhs a year and an additional ₹ 50,000 per year can be exempted under subsection 80 CCD.

Also Read: Online Games: What Risks Do They Pose To Children?

Though there are many more private and non-governmental schemes whit flexible options which offer you a lot of conveniences and promise higher returns, it is always wise to think about safety first when it comes to investments.

It is hard-earned money, and we cannot earn it again. So, it is always safer and wiser to go with a trustworthy scheme which may offer fewer returns than a fancy scheme which gives you a lot more.

The most important thing that guarantees high returns on your assiduous earnings is safety.