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Due to Increase in Temperature, Risk of Crocodile Attacks can Increase

The spread of the population would mean the reptiles will come across with people who have never come into contact

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Crocodile, Attacks, Global Warming
As temperatures rise, crocodiles will move into areas that they never previously inhabited. Pixabay

The number of crocodile attacks could rise due to global warming, an Australian expert said on Sunday.

Adam Britton, a zoologist from the Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods (RIEL) at Charles Darwin University (CDU) in the Northern Territory (NT),said that as temperatures rise, crocodiles will move into areas that they never previously inhabited, reports Xinhua news agency.

He said that the spread of the population would mean the reptiles will come across with people who have never come into contact with the reptiles before.

“As the planet warms, it does mean crocodile attacks are going to go up as a direct result, because as it warms, it’s going to change the distribution of crocodiles,” Britton said.

Crocodile, Attacks, Global Warming
The number of crocodile attacks could rise due to global warming. Pixabay

“We’re seeing in Indonesia, crocodiles move into places that they haven’t been seen for a long time or seen before and we’re getting a string of attacks.

“Crocodiles will move after loss of habitat and move into areas where people aren’t used to them,” he added.

Also Read- Would You Give Up Digital Life if Given Lifetime Data Protection?

According to Britton, there have already been sightings of crocodiles in populated areas of northern Queensland where they have been rarely spotted. (IANS)

Next Story

New York Governor Signs Ambitious Climate Change Bill with Goal of Slashing Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2030

He was joined by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, who has made fighting global warming his life's work

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climate change
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, right, accompanied by former Vice President Al Gore, announces that he is signing the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act, Thursday, July 18, 2019, at Fordham University in New York. VOA

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed an ambitious climate change bill Thursday with the goal of slashing the state’s greenhouse gas emissions 85% below what they were in 1990.

“Cries for a new green movement are hollow political rhetoric if not combined with aggressive goals and a realistic plan on how to achieve them,” Cuomo said before signing the bill into law. He was joined by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, who has made fighting global warming his life’s work. “We still have it within our power to grab hold of this crisis,” Gore said.

The measure Cuomo signed looks to use renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, to generate 70% of the state’s electric power by 2030. It also includes construction of massive wind farms off the coast of Long Island, which Cuomo said would generate enough electricity to power 1 million homes.

It was unclear how Cuomo and future New York state governments planned to put the ambitious plan into action. The governor and other state officials will put together a 22-member panel to devise that.

climate change
As the federal government retreats from dealing with climate change, major parts of corporate America are moving forward anyway. Pixabay

Warning about costs

Business leaders and utility companies, however, warned residents to expect higher electric bills because of the initial investment needed to build up solar and wind capacity.

ALSO READ: Education Institutions from Across the World Declares Climate Emergency

Meanwhile, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said last month was the hottest June for the globe since at least 1880, when record-keeping began. NOAA said the planet’s average temperature was 15.9 Celsius, or 60.6 Fahrenheit.

Climate experts say global warming caused by greenhouse gases is to blame and say more records will fall before summer ends in the Northern Hemisphere. Many large U.S. cities can expect dangerously high temperatures this weekend, including Washington, where it is expected to feel like 43 degrees Celsius Friday and Saturday. (VOA)