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Due to Increase in Temperature, Risk of Crocodile Attacks can Increase

The spread of the population would mean the reptiles will come across with people who have never come into contact

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Crocodile, Attacks, Global Warming
As temperatures rise, crocodiles will move into areas that they never previously inhabited. Pixabay

The number of crocodile attacks could rise due to global warming, an Australian expert said on Sunday.

Adam Britton, a zoologist from the Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods (RIEL) at Charles Darwin University (CDU) in the Northern Territory (NT),said that as temperatures rise, crocodiles will move into areas that they never previously inhabited, reports Xinhua news agency.

He said that the spread of the population would mean the reptiles will come across with people who have never come into contact with the reptiles before.

“As the planet warms, it does mean crocodile attacks are going to go up as a direct result, because as it warms, it’s going to change the distribution of crocodiles,” Britton said.

Crocodile, Attacks, Global Warming
The number of crocodile attacks could rise due to global warming. Pixabay

“We’re seeing in Indonesia, crocodiles move into places that they haven’t been seen for a long time or seen before and we’re getting a string of attacks.

“Crocodiles will move after loss of habitat and move into areas where people aren’t used to them,” he added.

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According to Britton, there have already been sightings of crocodiles in populated areas of northern Queensland where they have been rarely spotted. (IANS)

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Researchers Warn that Global Warming is Likely to Increase illness among individuals

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways

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Global Warming
Global Warming is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. Pixabay

Global warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned.

For the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researhers analysed daily hospitalisation data covering almost 80 per cent of Brazil between 2000 and 2015.

They studied the link between daily mean temperatures and hospitalisation for undernourishment according to the International Classification of Diseases.

“The association between increased heat and hospitalisation for undernutrition was greatest for individuals aged over 80, and those 5 to 19 years,” said the researchers from Monash University, Australia.

The researchers found that for every 1 degree Celsius increase in daily mean temperature during the hot season, there was a 2.5 per cent increase in the number of hospitalisations for undernutrition.

“We estimated that 15.6 per cent of undernutrition hospitalisations could be attributed to heat exposure during the study period,” said study’s lead author Yuming Guo.

The study said that increased heat may cause illness through undernourishment in a number of ways: reducing appetites, provoking more alcohol consumption, reducing motivation or ability to shop and cook and exacerbate any undernutrition, resulting in hospitalisation.

Global Warming
Global Warming is likely to increase illnesses caused by undernutrition, due to the effects of heat exposure, researchers have warned. Pixabay

“Climate change is one of the biggest threats to the reduction of hunger and undernutrition, especially in low and middle-income countries. It has been estimated that climate change will reduce global food availability by 3.2 per cent and thus cause about 30,000 underweight-related deaths by 2050,” the report said.

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“It is plausible to speculate that climate changes could not only increase the rate of undernutrition in the most affected areas of the globe, but at the same time, impair individuals’ capacity to adapt to projected rises in temperature,” said the researchers. (IANS)