Tuesday June 18, 2019
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Cryptominers: The Biggest Threat in Cyber World

Whether protecting against cryptominers, threats to the operational technology (OT) network or simply trying to keep up with what vulnerability to fix next, incorporating threat intelligence in vulnerability management programmes will give organisations the edge they need to counter a dynamic threat landscape, the report added

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Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals. Pixabay

While ransomware reigned supreme in 2017 accounting for 28 per cent of malware attacks and cryptominers only made up 9 per cent, the figures flipped in 2018, with ransomware dropping to 13 per cent of malware attacks and cryptojackers soaring to 27 per cent, a new report said on Tuesday.

“While cryptomining may seem like a relatively innocuous, low-priority threat, it’s important to remember that these attacks slow down system processes and may overwhelm system capacity,” said Senior Security Analyst Sivan Nir from cyber security company Skybox Security.

“The cryptominer may be only part of a larger attack structure. By letting them set up home in your network, you’re inviting them to try to gain access to other parts of your environment,” Nir added.

cloudhopper,cyber attacks
A man holds a laptop computer as cyber code is projected on him in this illustration picture. VOA

The report also warned of a false sense of security in Cloud networks.

Also Read- Bluetooth-based Location Tracking to Improve with New Feature

“While the security of Clouds is relatively strong, misconfiguration issues within them can still abound and security issues can arise within the applications used to manage such networks,” the findings showed.

Whether protecting against cryptominers, threats to the operational technology (OT) network or simply trying to keep up with what vulnerability to fix next, incorporating threat intelligence in vulnerability management programmes will give organisations the edge they need to counter a dynamic threat landscape, the report added. (IANS)

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43 Percent Increase in Social Media Frauds in 2018: Study

According to researchers, fraud in the mobile channel has grown significantly over the last several years, with 70 per cent of artifice originating in the mobile channel in 2018

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social media frauds
With one out of five cyber attacks attributed to rogue mobile apps in 2018, RSA identified an average of 82 rogue mobile applications a day last year across popular app stores. Pixabay

In a sign that platforms like Facebook and WhatsApp are emerging as new public square for criminal deception, a study has found that social media fraud increased 43 per cent in 2018.

The results suggest that cyber criminals are increasingly relying on Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and other legitimate social media and messaging platforms to communicate with each other and sell stolen identities, credit card numbers and other ill-gotten gains.

social media
According to researchers, fraud in the mobile channel has grown significantly over the last several years, with 70 per cent of artifice originating in the mobile channel in 2018. Pixabay

Given the ease of use, absence of fees and other benefits of these platforms, continuation of this trend in 2019 should come as no surprise, said “Current State of Cybercrime – 2019” white paper, released by RSA Security.

Trade in stolen identities would gain greater momentum with more stores likely opening on legitimate platforms to sell this type of data, the study said.  According to researchers, fraud in the mobile channel has grown significantly over the last several years, with 70 per cent of artifice originating in the mobile channel in 2018.

social media
With one out of five cyber attacks attributed to rogue mobile apps in 2018, RSA identified an average of 82 rogue mobile applications a day last year across popular app stores. Pixabay

In particular, fraud from mobile apps increased 680 per cent between 2015 and 2018, said the study, adding the use of rogue mobile applications to defraud consumers was on the rise.

ALSO READ: Fixing Algorithms Won’t Curb Fake News on Social Media

With one out of five cyber attacks attributed to rogue mobile apps in 2018, RSA identified an average of 82 rogue mobile applications a day last year across popular app stores.

“We expect the popularity of the mobile channel for fraud will continue through 2019, especially as cyber criminals keep finding ways to introduce tactics and technologies such as phishing and malware to the mobile channel,” the report said. (IANS)