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Cryptominers: The Biggest Threat in Cyber World

Whether protecting against cryptominers, threats to the operational technology (OT) network or simply trying to keep up with what vulnerability to fix next, incorporating threat intelligence in vulnerability management programmes will give organisations the edge they need to counter a dynamic threat landscape, the report added

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Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals. Pixabay

While ransomware reigned supreme in 2017 accounting for 28 per cent of malware attacks and cryptominers only made up 9 per cent, the figures flipped in 2018, with ransomware dropping to 13 per cent of malware attacks and cryptojackers soaring to 27 per cent, a new report said on Tuesday.

“While cryptomining may seem like a relatively innocuous, low-priority threat, it’s important to remember that these attacks slow down system processes and may overwhelm system capacity,” said Senior Security Analyst Sivan Nir from cyber security company Skybox Security.

“The cryptominer may be only part of a larger attack structure. By letting them set up home in your network, you’re inviting them to try to gain access to other parts of your environment,” Nir added.

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A man holds a laptop computer as cyber code is projected on him in this illustration picture. VOA

The report also warned of a false sense of security in Cloud networks.

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“While the security of Clouds is relatively strong, misconfiguration issues within them can still abound and security issues can arise within the applications used to manage such networks,” the findings showed.

Whether protecting against cryptominers, threats to the operational technology (OT) network or simply trying to keep up with what vulnerability to fix next, incorporating threat intelligence in vulnerability management programmes will give organisations the edge they need to counter a dynamic threat landscape, the report added. (IANS)

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More Than 76% Indian Companies Hit by Cyber Attacks in Year 2018

More than 18 per cent threats discovered in India are on mobile devices, which is almost double than the global average

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Image source: wordpress.com

Over 76 per cent organisations in India were hit by cyber attacks in 2018 as IT security continued to be a major issue across the globe, global cyber security major Sophos said on Wednesday.

According to Sophos’ “7 Uncomfortable Truths of Endpoint Security” survey, IT managers are more likely to catch cyber criminals on their organisation’s servers and networks than anywhere else.

IT managers discovered 39 per cent of their most significant cyber attacks on their organisation’s servers and 34.5 per cent on its networks.

The survey was conducted on 3,000 IT decision-makers from mid-sized businesses in 12 countries including the US, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, the UK, France, Germany, Australia, Japan, India and South Africa.

Cyberattacks
An employee works near screens in the virus lab at the headquarters of Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Labs in Moscow, July 29, 2013. VOA

More than 18 per cent threats discovered in India are on mobile devices, which is almost double than the global average.

Also, 92 per cent Indian IT managers wished they had a stronger team in place to properly detect, investigate and respond to security incidents.

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“Server security stakes are at an all-time high with servers being used to store financial, employee, proprietary and other sensitive data. Today, IT managers need to focus on protecting business-critical servers to stop cyber criminals from getting on to the network,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales at Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

“They can’t ignore endpoints because most cyber attacks start there, yet a higher than expected amount of IT managers still can’t identify how threats are getting into the system and when.” (IANS)