Wednesday January 29, 2020

Having Curd Daily Can Help Reduce Anxiety, Says Study

In addition to the use of psychiatric drugs for treatment, “we can also consider regulating intestinal flora to alleviate anxiety symptoms,” said researchers

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Indian superstition and the 'could be' logic behind them
Curd provides calming effect to the body. Wikimedia

Having probiotics can not only regulate gut bacteria — trillions of microorganisms in the gut which perform key functions in the immune system and metabolism — but also improve brain function and, thus, reduce anxiety, find researchers.

Probiotics are living organisms found naturally in some foods that are also known as “good” or “friendly” bacteria because they fight against harmful bacteria and prevent them from settling in the gut.

Recent research also suggests that mental disorders could be treated by regulating the intestinal microbiota, but there was no specific evidence to support this.

“Gut microbiota can help regulate brain function through something called the ‘gut-brain axis,’” found the researchers from the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine.

To reach this conclusion, the researchers reviewed 21 studies that had looked at 1,503 people collectively.

The team found that probiotic supplements in seven studies within their analysis contained only one kind of probiotic, two studies used a product that contained two kinds of probiotics, and the supplements used in the other five studies included at least three kinds.

FILE – Cheese makers prepare curds for Parmesan cheese at 4 Madonne Caseificio dell’Emilia dairy cooperative in Modena, Italy, Feb. 16, 2016. VOA

Overall, 11 of the 21 studies showed a positive effect on anxiety symptoms by regulating intestinal microbiota, meaning that more than half (52 per cent) of the studies showed this approach to be effective.

Of the 14 studies that had used probiotics as the intervention, more than a third (36 per cent) found them to be effective in reducing anxiety symptoms, while six of the remaining seven studies that had used non-probiotics as interventions found those to be effective – a 86 per cent rate of effectiveness.

Non-probiotic interventions were also more effective.

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Most of the studies did not report serious adverse events, and only four studies reported mild adverse effects such as dry mouth and diarrhoea.

“People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements,” suggested the review of studies published in the journal General Psychiatry.

In addition to the use of psychiatric drugs for treatment, “we can also consider regulating intestinal flora to alleviate anxiety symptoms,” said researchers. (IANS)

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Hiver Survey: More Than 60% Indian Millennials Feel Anxious About Unread Emails

Millennials across the globe today are increasingly getting hooked on to the practice of keeping their inbox empty/near-empty

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Millennials
More than 60 per cent millennials in India feel anxious when they see unread emails in their inbox. Pixabay

BY PUJA GUPTA

More than 60 per cent millennials in India feel anxious when they see unread emails in their inbox, reveals a survey.

The survey was conducted by Hiver with over 600 millennials in India to understand their work email behavior patterns.

Millennials across the globe today are increasingly getting hooked on to the practice of keeping their inbox empty/near-empty at all times – popularly known as eInbox Zero.’

Millennials
As many as 63 per cent millennials agreed that long emails hampered their workplace productivity. Pixabay

The survey also revealed that as many as two in five millennials get extremely uncomfortable if they haven’t been able to check their work email for three-four hours at a stretch.

When asked about the first app that they check on their phone upon waking up, 59 per cent chose WhatsApp, 29 per cent mentioned social media apps such as Instagram and Facebook, and only 9 per cent said emails.

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The findings also reveal some interesting insights on how emails affect employee productivity. As many as 63 per cent millennial agreed that long emails hampered their workplace productivity, and that they preferred them to be shorter and eto the point’. Another 60 per cent interestingly said that emails can be a good substitute for workplace meetings. (IANS)