Sunday January 19, 2020

Cut out on These Specific Foods to Prevent Gastrointestinal Issues

It is important that people take care if deciding to follow a low FODMAP diet, as reductions in total caloric and carbohydrate intake may impact on nutritional quality

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A worker removes expired food in a local supermarket in Brussels, Jan. 16, 2017. VOA

Cutting out specific foods can alleviate gastrointestinal issues for physically active people, especially a runner, researchers say.

The study, conducted by researchers from the Anglia Ruskin University in Britain, showed that a low fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyol (or FODMAP) diet reduces some of the issues caused by exercise such as stomach cramps and bloating, and improves a person’s perceived ability to exercise.

FODMAP foods include those containing lactose (milk, yoghurt and cheese), fructans (found in cereals, breads and pasta), galactic-oligosaccharides (legumes and onions), excess fructose (for example in apples, pears and asparagus) and polyols (often added as a food additive).

“We found a clear benefit when following the low FODMAP diet, with a reduction in exercise-related gastrointestinal symptoms amongst otherwise healthy, recreational runners,” said Justin Roberts, Principal Lecturer at the varsity.

For the study, the researchers involved a group of healthy recreational exercisers.

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Cutting out on these foods can help combat gastrointestinal issues . Flickr

Everyone in the group followed two eating plans for one week at a time, with the key difference being the FODMAP content.

The findings, published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, found that 69 per cent of those following a low FODMAP diet experienced an improvement in symptoms and were able to exercise more frequently and at a higher intensity.

In addition, the improvement in perceived pain, in conjunction with reduced experiences of bloating whilst on a low FODMAP diet, is likely explained by a reduction in intestinal water volume and gas production, caused by fewer indigestible carbohydrates available for fermentation in the gut.

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However, further studies are needed to examine the benefits of this diet when combined with long-term training strategies.

It is important that people take care if deciding to follow a low FODMAP diet, as reductions in total caloric and carbohydrate intake may impact on nutritional quality, Roberts suggested. (IANS)

Next Story

Eating More Plant-Based Foods Link to Better Heart Health

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers reviewed a database of food intake information from more than 10,000 middle-aged US adults

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Eating a larger proportion of plant-based foods and a smaller proportion of animal-based foods may help reduce your risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other type of cardiovascular disease. Pixabay

Eating more plant-based foods and fewer animal-based foods may be linked to better heart health and a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests.

“Eating a larger proportion of plant-based foods and a smaller proportion of animal-based foods may help reduce your risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other type of cardiovascular disease,” said study lead researcher, Casey M. Rebholz, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the US.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers reviewed a database of food intake information from more than 10,000 middle-aged US adults who were monitored from 1987 through 2016 and did not have cardiovascular disease at the start of the study.

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Eating more plant-based foods and fewer animal-based foods may be linked to better heart health and a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests. Pixabay

Those who ate the most plant-based foods overall had a 16 per cent lower risk of having a cardiovascular disease such as heart attacks, stroke, heart failure and other conditions; 32 per cent lower risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease and 25 per cent lower risk of dying from any cause compared to those who ate the least amount of plant-based foods.

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“Our findings underscore the importance of focusing on your diet. There might be some variability in terms of individual foods but to reduce cardiovascular disease risk people should eat more vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fruits, legumes and fewer animal-based foods,” Rebholz said. (IANS)