Friday November 16, 2018

Cutting Carbon emissions can increase world hunger : New Study

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New York: As several nations brace for implementing plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions, such efforts to rein in global temperatures may lead to more people going hungry, a new study suggests.

“That risk doesn’t negate the need for mitigation, but highlights the importance of comprehensive policies,” said lead researcher Tomoko Hasegawa, National Institute for Environmental Studies in Japan.

Previous studies have shown, that climate change reduces how much food farms can produce, which could lead to more people suffering from hunger.

Curbing the greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change can help maintain the yields of existing crops.

But there might be indirect ways in which cutting emissions could actually put more people at risk of going hungry, said the study published in ACS journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

“For example, some grasses and other vegetation used for bio fuels, require agricultural land that might otherwise be used for food production. So, increased bio fuel consumption could negatively affect the food supply,” Hasegawa noted.

Also, the high cost of low-emissions technologies, such as carbon capture and storage will be borne by consumers, who will then have less money to spend on food.

The researchers used multiple models to determine the effects of strict emissions cuts, and found that many more people would be at risk of hunger then, more than if those cuts weren’t in place.

The team concluded that governments will have to take measures, such as increasing food aid, as they address climate change. (IANS)

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World Hunger To Rise Due To Climate Change: WFP

The number of people suffering from hunger because of climate change-induced drought is rising particularly in Africa and Latin America.

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hunger, health care
Malnourished and displaced Somali children sit in a tent in their camp on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia. VOA

The World Food Program warns climate change will have a devastating impact on agriculture and the ability of people to feed themselves. The WFP forecasts a huge increase in worldwide hunger unless action is taken to slow global warming.

The WFP warns progress in reducing global hunger is under threat by conflict and the increase in climate disasters. For the first time in several decades, the WFP reports the number of people suffering from chronic food shortages has risen.

This year, it says, 821 million people went to bed hungry, 11 million more than the previous year.

World Hunger, WFP
Gatdin Bol, 65, who fled fighting and now survives by eating fruit from the trees, sits under a tree in the town of Kandak, South Sudan. VOA

Gernot Laganda, WFP’s chief of Climate and Disaster Risk Reduction, notes the number of climate disasters has more than doubled since the early 1990s. He says extreme weather events are driving more people to flee their homes, leading to more hunger.

He told VOA the situation will get much worse as global temperatures rise.

“We are projecting that with a two-degree warmer world, we will have around 189 million people in a status of food insecurity more than today. And, if it is a four-degrees warmer world, which is possible if no action is taken, we are looking beyond one billion more. So, there is a very, very strong argument for early and decisive climate action,” said Laganda.

World Hunger, WFP
Faduma Hussein Yagoub, a polio sufferer, came with her family to Dadaab from Somalia. Her husband and two of her five young children died of hunger on the way. Despite the dangers thousands of refugees every week are making the journey, walking for weeks across the desert and braving attacks by armed robbers and wild animals:

Data from this year’s State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report by six leading U.N. agencies show the bulk of losses and damages in food systems are due to drought and most of these disastrous events occur in Africa.

Also Read: Australia Rejects U.N. Climate Report, Continues Using Coal

Laganda says the number of people suffering from hunger because of climate change-induced drought is rising particularly in Africa and Latin America. He notes that until recently progress in Asia had led to a reduction in world hunger, but that trend has slowed markedly. (VOA)