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Cyber Attack: Dark Web-Listing of Malware Designed to Target Top Companies is on Rise

Four in 10 dark net vendors are selling targeted hacking services

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Cyber Attack, Web-Listing, Malware
The dark net is that part of the Internet which is inaccessible when using standard browsers like Google. Pixabay

There has been a 20 per cent rise in the dark net listings of malware targeting enterprises, warns a study.

The dark net is that part of the Internet which is inaccessible when using standard browsers like Google.

The study by cybersecurity company Bromium and researchers at the University of Surrey in Britain found that four in 10 dark net vendors are selling targeted hacking services aimed at FTSE 100 and Fortune 500 businesses.

The research provides details of first-hand intelligence gathered from covert discussions with dark net vendors, alongside analysis from a panel of global industry experts across law enforcement and government.

Cyber Attack, Web-Listing, Malware
There has been a 20 per cent rise in the dark net listings of malware targeting enterprises. Wikimedia Commons

Furthermore, access to corporate networks is sold openly, with 60 per cent of vendors approached by researchers offering access to more than ten business networks each.

Of the dark net vendors who were engaged, 70 per cent invited researchers to talk on encrypted messaging applications, like Telegram, to take conversations beyond the reach of law enforcement.

More than 40 per cent of attempts by researchers to request dark net hacking services targeting companies in the Fortune 500 or FTSE 100 received positive responses from dark net vendors, the study said.

“Almost every vendor offered us tailored versions of malware as a way of targeting specific companies or industries. The more targeted the attack, the higher the cost, with prices rising even further when it involved high-value targets like banks,” said Mike McGuire, Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Surrey.

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“The most expensive piece of malware found was designed to target ATMs and retailed for approximately $1,500,” McGuire said.

These services typically come with service plans for conducting the hack, with prices ranging from $150 to $10,000 depending on the company involved and the extent to which the malware was customised for targeted attacks, said the study.

The research was presented at the InfoSecurity Europe conference in Olympia, London.(IANS)

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Cyber Threat Landscape To Worsen In 2020

90% organisations believe that cyber threat landscape will worsen in 2020

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Cyber crime
90 per cent of organisations believe the cyber threat landscape will stay the same or worsen in 2020. Pixabay

With the perpetually shifting threat landscape, over 90 per cent of organisations believe the cyber threat landscape will stay the same or worsen in 2020 while 51 per cent of organisations do not believe they are ready for or would respond well to a cyber attack or breach, a new report by US-based cyber security firm FireEye said on Tuesday.

FireEye’s “Cyber Trendscape” report surveyed over 800 Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) and other senior executives across North America, Europe and Asia to uncover attitudes towards some of cyber security’s most prevalent topics.

“Our new ‘Cyber Trendscape’ report highlights the overall beliefs and perceptions of senior leaders regarding top cyber security priorities for 2020 and beyond as well areas where they differ across the globe,” Eric Ouellet, Global Security Strategist at FireEye, said in a statement.

“These critical data points will help organisations to bring focus and clarity to their cyber security programmes, while helping to expand the dialogue with senior leadership and the board,” Oullet added.

Cyber attack
The cyber threat landscape will worse in 2020. Pixabay

According to the report, 29 per cent of organisations with cyber attack and breach response plans in place have not tested or updated them in the last 12 months or more.

Globally, organisations allocated their cyber security budgets into four main categories with the largest allocations going to the areas of prevention (42 per cent) and detection (28 per cent), followed by containment and remediation.

However, Japan was the only country to break away from this order, expressing a greater emphasis on detection (40 per cent) and then prevention (35 per cent).

Notably, 44 per cent global respondents expressed having transitioned some of their environment to the Cloud, and that they were monitoring cautiously.

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Additionally, 35 per cent had transitioned some of their environment with plans to continue, and 17 per cent had completed a full Cloud deployment. US organisations reported being furthest along in adopting a Cloud-first approach with 37 per cent having finished a complete Cloud migration. (IANS)