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Cyber-Security Project of Google Named ‘Chronicle’ Imploads in Trouble

Originally announced as an independent start up in early 2018 by Google's parent company Alphabet, Chronicle was was supposed to "revolutionise" cybersecurity

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Chronicle
One of the reasons why Chronicle was folded back into Google is the fact that staff compensation became a sore point. Pixabay

Cybersecurity project of Google named “Chronicle” is imploding in trouble and some employees feel its management “abandoned and betrayed” the original vision, media reports said.

Chronicle’s CEO and Chief Security Officer have already left and the Chief Technology Officer is leaving later this month while other key officials are eyeing an exit, according to the Motherboard.

In June this year, Chronicle lost its status as an independent entity when it formally joined Google to become part of its Cloud security offerings.

One of the reasons why it was folded back into Google is the fact that staff compensation became a sore point, because Google reportedly didn’t adjust Chronicle staffers’ salaries and stock packages, which were lower than those for other Google employees.

Originally announced as an independent start up in early 2018 by Google’s parent company Alphabet, Chronicle was was supposed to “revolutionise” cybersecurity.

Chronicle
Cybersecurity project of Google named “Chronicle” is imploding in trouble and some employees feel its management “abandoned and betrayed” the original vision. Pixabay

It was supposed to be an independent start up with its own contracts and policies — at least, that’s what CEO Stephen Gillett wrote when the business was launched.

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Employees have left because of a combination of Chronicle losing its original vision, a distant CEO, a lack of clarity about Chronicle’s future, and disappointment that the start-up has been swallowed into Google, according to interviews with five current and former employees, the Motherboard report added. (IANS)

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Google To Unveil New Feature that Allows Users to Check Their Pronounciation

Presently, it is available on mobile in American English and is coming soon in Spanish

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Google
Google is also improving its word translations and definitions with visual prompts. Pixabay

Google search is rolling out a new feature that will let users check their pronunciation of unfamiliar words with the help of machine learning.

With this new feature, a user will be able to speak into their microphone and then Google’s AI will analyze the snippet and compare it against the word’s correct pronunciation.

Then, the user will receive feedback on how each syllable matches Google’s expected pronunciation.

‘For example, if you are practicing how to say “asterisk,” the speech recognition technology analyzes how you said the word and then, it recognizes that the last soundbite was pronounced ‘rict’ instead of ‘hsk,’ Google said in a statement recently.

Presently, it is available on mobile in American English and is coming soon in Spanish.

Google is also improving its word translations and definitions with visual prompts.

Google search is rolling out a new feature that will let users check their pronunciation of unfamiliar words with the help of machine learning.
Pixabay

Google
Google search is rolling out a new feature that will let users check their pronunciation of unfamiliar words with the help of machine learning. Pixabay

“Starting rolling out today, when you look up the translation of a word or its definition, you will start seeing images that give you additional context. This can be useful with words that have multiple meanings like “seal,” or words like “avocado” that aren’t commonly used in all languages or regions,” the company added.

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According to Google, these new features give a creative, more effective way to practice, visualize and remember new words and the company is planning to expand these features to more languages, accents and regions in the future. (IANS)