Tuesday March 31, 2020
Home Lead Story Cybercriminal...

Cybercriminals Exploit Public Fear of Uprising Novel Coronavirus Pandemic Through Malware

Along with the consistent increase of 2019 coronavirus cases comes the incessant techniques cybercriminals are using to prey on public panic amidst the global epidemic, the company said in a statement

0
//
Coronavirus
One of the latest spam campaigns mimics the World Health Organization (WHO), showing how cybercriminals recognize and are capitalising on the important role WHO has in providing trustworthy information about the coronavirus. Pixabay

Cybercriminals continue to exploit public fear of rising coronavirus cases through malware and phishing emails in the disguise of content coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US and World Health Organisation (WHO), says cybersecurity firm Kaspersky.

In the APAC region, Kaspersky has detected 93 coronavirus-related malware in Bangladesh, 53 in the Philippines, 40 in China, 23 in Vietnam, 22 in India and 20 in Malaysia. Single-digit detections were monitored in Singapore, Japan, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Myanmar, and Thailand.

Along with the consistent increase of 2019 coronavirus cases comes the incessant techniques cybercriminals are using to prey on public panic amidst the global epidemic, the company said in a statement.

Kaspersky also detected emails offering products such as masks, and then the topic became more commonly used in Nigerian spam emails. Researchers also found scam emails with phishing links and malicious attachments. One of the latest spam campaigns mimics the World Health Organization (WHO), showing how cybercriminals recognize and are capitalising on the important role WHO has in providing trustworthy information about the coronavirus.

Coronavirus
Cybercriminals continue to exploit public fear of rising coronavirus cases through malware and phishing emails in the disguise of content coming from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US and World Health Organisation (WHO), says cybersecurity firm Kaspersky. Pixabay

“We would encourage companies to be particularly vigilant at this time, and ensure employees who are working at home exercise caution. “Businesses should communicate clearly with workers to ensure they are aware of the risks, and do everything they can to secure remote access for those self-isolating or working from home,” commented David Emm, principal security researcher. Some malicious files are spread via email.

For example, an Excel file distributed via email under the guise of a list of coronavirus victims allegedly sent from the World Health Organization (WHO) was, in fact, a Trojan-Downloader, which secretly downloads and installs another malicious file.

ALSO READ: Tech Giant Amazon Urges Employees To Work From Home Due To Coronavirus Pandemic

This second file was a Trojan-Spy designed to gather various data, including passwords, from the infected device and send it to the attacker. (IANS)

Next Story

Spread of Fake News on high Rise on Facebook, Twitter Amidst Coronavirus Pandemic

Jumbling of content makes viewers less likely to check sources

0
Fake News
The findings of a researcch show the dangers of people getting their news from social media sites like Facebook or Twitter, Pixabay

In novel coronavirus times, there is so much fake news going around and according to new research, there’s a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures.

Jumbling of content makes viewers less likely to check sources, said the team from Ohio State University, adding that people viewing a blend of news and entertainment on a social media site tended to pay less attention to the source of content they consumed – meaning they could easily mistake satire or fiction for real news.

“The findings show the dangers of people getting their news from social media sites like Facebook or Twitter,” said study author George Pearson, a senior lecturer and research associate in communication at The Ohio State University.

“We are drawn to these social media sites because they are one-stop shops for media content, updates from friends and family, and memes or cat pictures,” Pearson added. People who viewed content that was clearly separated into categories – such as current affairs and entertainment – didn’t have the same issues evaluating the source and credibility of content they read.

“Jumbling of content makes everything seem the same to us. It makes it harder for us to distinguish what we need to take seriously from that which is only entertainment,” said Pearson in the study appeared in the journal New Media & Society. For the study, Pearson created a fictional social media site called “Link Me.”

The 370 participants saw four webpages with either two or four posts each. Each post consisted of a headline and short paragraph summarizing the story, as well as information on the source of the post. The sources were designed to be either high or low credibility, based on their name and description.

Please Follow NewsGram on Twitter Fro Updates From Around The World!

Fake News, Lie, News, Media, Disinformation, Propaganda
 In novel coronavirus times, there is so much fake news going around and according to new research, there’s a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures. Pixabay

All posts were based on real articles or public social media posts taken from Reddit or Tumblr. The results showed that when the content was not grouped by distinct topics – in other words, news posts appeared on the same page with entertainment posts – participants reported paying less attention to the source of the content.

“They were less likely to verify source information to ensure that it was a credible source,” said Pearson. That may be one reason why satirical and other types of fake news get shared by people who evidently think it is real. One solution would be for social media companies to develop tools to distinguish content.

ALSO READ: Rise in Temperature May Double The Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: Study

But until that happens, it is up to users to pay more attention to where their news is coming from – as difficult as that may be. (IANS)