Sunday May 27, 2018

Choosing Cycling can Add your Daily health Benefits

Benefits of choosing cycling.

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Cycling
Cycling. Pixabay
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  • Cycling is simple and easy so, make it your lifestyle to stay fit.

    “Cyclists gravitate to the activity for many reasons, but its impact on one’s health is undeniable.” says cyclist Yogesh Kumar

It demands only two to four hours a week, in order to achieve general health improvement, he said and that regular cycling helps people of all age groups to attain a desirable level of fitness.

“Pedaling utilizes some of the major muscle groups and therefore, makes for a good muscle-workout,” he said.

Adding to the benefits, Ajit Ravindran, Managing Director and co-founder, Meraki Sport & Entertainment, said: “Unlike other forms of workout, the person exercising can decide the intensity of the workout and therefore, is perfect for people recovering from injuries or illness. Furthermore, it can also be built to a physically demanding workout.”

“Cycling is simple and easy and does not require special skills or high levels of physical capabilities, which makes cycling perfect for beginners,” he added.

Being an aerobic activity, cycling also improves cardiovascular fitness, joint mobility, decreased stress level, decreased body fat levels, improved posture and coordination and much more.

So, go out and dive into the world of health and fitness, he suggested.(IANS)

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Cycling responsible for maximum fractures in males: Study

The incidence of injuries in males was 1.7 times higher for neck sprains and 3.6 times greater for fractures when compared to females

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Cycling causes most fractures in men. VOA
Most fractures in men are caused by cycling. VOA
  • Cycling is healthy
  • But it also causes maximum fractures in males
  • The most common injury is spinal injury

While regular cycling has been associated with various health benefits, including a healthy heart, bones as well as decrease in body fat, a new study has shown that the recreational sport is the number one cause of cervical fractures in men.

The findings showed that sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 per cent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries.

Cycling causes maximum fractures in men.
Cycling causes maximum fractures in men.

Men experienced the most fractures due to cycling, while the most common cause of fractures in women was horseback riding.

“Cervical spine injury is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality, and, as far as injuries go, one of the more devastating injuries that we as orthopaedic surgeons can treat,” said lead author J. Mason DePasse, from the Brown University in Rhode Island, US.

“Our study showed that cycling is the number one cause of neck fractures, which suggests we may need to investigate this in terms of safety,” DePasse added.

For the study, the team examined 50,000 patient cases in the national database to estimate the sex-specific incidence of cervical spine injuries in sporting activities and to identify the activities most commonly associated with neck sprains and cervical fractures.

The study authors identified 27,546 patients who sustained a neck injury during a sporting activity. Overall, the number of neck sprains decreased by 33 per cent from 2000 to 2015; however, sprains sustained during weightlifting and aerobic exercise increased 66 per cent.

Cycling is a very healthy exercise yet it can be harmful if not done properly. Pixabay
Cycling is a very healthy exercise yet it can be harmful if not done properly. Pixabay

Sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 30 per cent in that time period, which was driven in part by a 300 per cent increase in cycling-related injuries.

The incidence of injuries in males was 1.7 times higher for neck sprains and 3.6 times greater for fractures when compared to females. The findings were presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in New Orleans. IANS

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