Wednesday October 23, 2019

Cycling, Walking Likely To Develop Better Mental Health

This association was even stronger among people who reported active commuting, the team said.

0
//
CyclingStress, meditation, PTSD
Cycling, walking in nature may improve your mental health. Pixabay

People who commute — walking or cycling — through natural environments are more likely to develop better mental health than those who commute less, according to a new study.

Natural environments included all public and private outdoor spaces that contain ‘green’ and/or ‘blue’ natural elements such as street trees, forests, city parks and natural parks/reserves and all types of water bodies.

“Mental health and physical inactivity are two of the main public health problems associated with the life in urban environments. Urban design could be a powerful tool to confront these challenges and create healthier cities. One way of doing so would be investing in natural commuting routes for cycling and walking,” said Mark Nieuwenhuijsen from the University of Barcelona.

For the study, published in the journal, Environment International, the research team examined nearly 3,600 participants who answered a questionnaire about their commuting habits and their mental health.

walking
A couple walking, Pixabay

The findings showed that respondents commuting through natural environments on a daily basis had on average a 2.74 point higher mental health score compared to those who commuted through natural environments less frequently.

This association was even stronger among people who reported active commuting, the team said.

Also Read- Tesla Unveils New “Model 3” With ‘mid-range’ Battery Pack

“From previous experimental studies we knew that physical activity in natural environments can reduce stress, improve mood and mental restoration when compared to the equivalent activity in urban environments,” said first author Wilma Zijlema from the varsity.

“Although this study is the first of its kind to our knowledge and, therefore, more research will be needed, our data show that commuting through these natural spaces alone may also have a positive effect on mental health.” (IANS)

Next Story

Playing Sports Linked with Lower Mental Health Issues: Study

The study analysed data from 10,951 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health)

0
Mental Health
According to Study, those who reported that they did not intend to participate in Sports during age 8 to 14 were 22 per cent more likely to suffer Mental Health Issues in their late 20s and 30s. Pixabay

Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, says a new study.

Published in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years found that those who play sports are less likely to suffer from mental health issues by their late 20s to early 30s.

“There is a common perception that there’s a direct causal link between youth contact sports, head injuries and downstream adverse effects like impaired cognitive ability and mental health, we did not find that,” said study lead author Adam Bohr from University of Colorado Boulder.

The study analysed data from 10,951 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), a representative sample of youth in seventh through 12th grades who have been interviewed and tested repeatedly since 1994.

Participants were categorised into groups: those who, in 1994, said they intended to participate in contact sports; those who intended to play non-contact sports; and those who did not intend to play sports.

Among males, 26 per cent said they intended to play football.

Sports
There is a common perception that there’s a direct causal link between youth contact Sports, head injuries and downstream adverse effects like impaired cognitive ability and Mental Health. Pixabay

After controlling for socioeconomic status, education, race and other factors, the researchers analysed scores through 2008 on word and number recall and questionnaires asking whether participants had been diagnosed with depression or attempted or thoughts about suicide.

“We were unable to find any meaningful difference between individuals who participated in contact sports and those who participated in non-contact sports. Across the board, across all measures, they looked more or less the same later in life,” said Bohr.

Football players had a lower incidence of depression in early adulthood than other groups, said researchers.

ALSO READ: Absence of Google Apps Hurting Huawei the Most

According to them, those who reported that they did not intend to participate in sports during age 8 to 14 were 22 per cent more likely to suffer depression in their late 20s and 30s. (IANS)