Wednesday February 20, 2019

Daily Exercise May Boost Better Lung Function Among Smokers

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries

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According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay
According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay

If you are a smoker try doing regular physical activities as it may help you to have better lung function, a new study suggests.

“This result highlights the importance of physical activity among current smokers specifically, which are a group at higher risk of poor lung function,” said the lead author of the study Elaine Fuertes, a researcher from the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal).

“One possible explanation for this result may be that physical activity improves respiratory muscle endurance and strength via a short or moderate-term effect that requires sustained physical effort to maintain it,” Fuertes added.

ALSO READ: Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity 

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay
For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay

Over a 10-year period, 3,912 adults (aged between 27 to 57-years-old at the start of the study) were considered as being active if they exercised with a frequency of two or more times a week and a duration of one hour a week or more.

Associations between physical activity and lung function were only apparent among current smokers, suggesting the existence of an inflammation-related biological mechanism, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

The researchers also found that participants who were active at the end of the study, either by becoming active or remaining active throughout, had significantly higher lung function than those consistently inactive.

“The results of this study strengthen the epidemiological evidence supporting an association between physical activity and respiratory health,” said co-author Judith Garcia-Aymerich, Head of the Non-Communicable Diseases and Environment Programme at ISGlobal.

“This evidence should be used to inform and support public health messages that promote increasing and maintaining physical activity as a way of preserving respiratory health in middle-aged adults,” Garcia-Aymerich noted.

Next Story

E-Cigarettes Twice As Effective In Helping Smokers Quit: Study

Ian Armitage was skeptical about e-cigarettes as a way to stop smoking, saying he tried vaping several years ago but gave it up.

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E-cigarettes, Smokers
A woman smokes an electronic cigarette in London, Aug. 19, 2015. VOA

A major new study provides the strongest evidence yet that vaping can help smokers quit cigarettes, with e-cigarettes proving nearly twice as effective as nicotine gums and patches.

The British research, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, could influence what doctors tell their patients and shape the debate in the U.S., where the Food and Drug Administration has come under pressure to more tightly regulate the burgeoning industry amid a surge in teenage vaping.

“We know that patients are asking about e-cigarettes and many doctors haven’t been sure what to say,” said Dr. Nancy Rigotti, a tobacco treatment specialist at Harvard Medical School who was not involved in the study. “I think they now have more evidence to endorse e-cigarettes.”

At the same time, Rigotti and other experts cautioned that no vaping products have been approved in the U.S. to help smokers quit.

e-cigarette, smokers
Packages of flavored liquids for e-cigarettes are seen displayed at a smoke shop in New York City. VOA

 

Top cause of preventable death

Smoking is the No. 1 cause of preventable death worldwide, blamed for nearly 6 million deaths a year. Quitting is notoriously difficult, even with decades-old nicotine aids and newer prescription drugs. More than 55 percent of U.S. smokers try to quit each year, and only about 7 percent succeed, according to government figures.

Electronic cigarettes, which have been available in the U.S. since about 2007 and have grown into a $6.6 billion-a-year industry, are battery-powered devices that typically heat a flavored nicotine solution into an inhalable vapor.

Most experts agree the vapor is less harmful than cigarette smoke since it doesn’t contain most of the cancer-causing byproducts of burning tobacco. But there is virtually no research on the long-term effects of the chemicals in the vapor, some of which are toxic.

At the same time, there have been conflicting studies on whether e-cigarettes actually help smokers kick the habit. Last year, an influential panel of U.S. experts concluded there was only “limited evidence” of their effectiveness.

In the new study, researchers tracked nearly 900 middle-age smokers who were randomly assigned to receive either e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement products, including patches, gums and lozenges. After one year, 18 percent of e-cigarette users were smoke-free, versus 9.9 percent of those using the other products.

“Anything which helps smokers to avoid heart disease and cancer and lung disease is a good thing, and e-cigarettes can do that,” said Peter Hajek, study co-author and an addiction specialist at Queen Mary University of London.

e-cigarette, cigarettes
Customers puff on e-cigarettes at the Henley Vaporium in New York City. VOA

More rigorous

The study was more rigorous than previous ones, which largely surveyed smokers about e-cigarette use. Participants in this experiment underwent chemical breath testing.

Smokers in the e-cigarette group received a $26 starter kit, while those in the nicotine-replacement group received a three-month supply of the product of their choice, costing about $159. Participants were responsible for buying follow-up supplies.

“If you have a method of helping people with smoking cessation that is both more effective and less costly, that should be of great interest to anyone providing health services,” said Kenneth Warner, a retired University of Michigan public health professor who was not involved in the study.

Several factors may have boosted the results: All the participants were recruited from a government smoking-cessation program and were presumably motivated to quit. They also received four weeks of anti-smoking counseling.

The researchers didn’t test e-cigarettes against new drugs such as Pfizer’s Chantix, which has shown higher rates of success than older nicotine-based treatments.

Funding for the study came from the British government, which has embraced e-cigarettes as a potential tool to combat smoking through state-run health services. Some of the authors have been paid consultants to makers of anti-smoking products.

e-cigarette, vaping
In this April 11, 2018, photo, an unidentified 15-year-old high school student uses a vaping device near the school’s campus in Cambridge, Mass. Health and education officials across the country are raising alarms over wide underage use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that’s sold in sugary flavors like mango and mint — and often with the addictive drug nicotine. VOA

Long-term questions

U.S. health authorities have been more reluctant about backing the products, in part because of the long-term effects are unknown.

“We need more studies about their safety profile, and I don’t think anyone should be changing practice based on one study,” said Belinda Borrelli, a psychologist specializing in smoking cessation at Boston University.

The American Heart Association backed e-cigarettes in 2014 as a last resort to help smokers quit after trying counseling and approved products. The American Cancer Society took a similar position last year.

An editorial accompanying the study and co-written by Borrelli recommended e-cigarettes only after smokers have tried and failed to quit with FDA-approved products. Also, doctors should have a clear timeline for stopping e-cigarette use.

Borrelli noted that after one year, 80 percent of the e-cigarette users in the study were still using the devices. Nine percent of the participants in the other group were still using gums and other nicotine-replacement products.

E-cigarettes, Smokers
Talia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York, Feb. 20, 2014. VOA

No vaping company has announced plans to seek FDA approval of its products as a quit-smoking aid. Winning such an endorsement would require large studies that can take years and cost millions of dollars.

The FDA has largely taken a hands-off approach toward vaping. It has not scientifically reviewed any of the e-cigarettes on the market and has put off some key regulations until 2022. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has said he doesn’t want to over-regulate an emerging industry that could provide a safer option for adult smokers.

The delay has come under intense criticism amid an explosion in teenage vaping, driven chiefly by devices like Juul, which resembles a flash drive. Federal law prohibits sales to those under 18, but 1 in 5 high school students reported vaping last year, according to a government survey. It showed teenage use surged 78 percent from 2017 to 2018.

Tank vs. cartridge

Matthew Myers of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids noted that the British study used so-called tank-based e-cigarettes, which allow users to customize their flavors and nicotine levels. Those devices have largely been overtaken in the U.S. by Juul and similar devices that have prefilled nicotine cartridges, or pods. Any benefit of e-cigarettes depends on the individual product and how it is used, he said.

“It is a fundamental mistake to think that all e-cigarettes are alike,” Myers said. “And in the absence of FDA regulation, a consumer has no way of knowing if the product they are using has the potential to help them or not.”

e-cigarette
E-cigarette additives impair lung function: Study.

Myers’ group is one of several anti-smoking organizations suing the FDA to immediately begin reviewing e-cigarettes.

Ian Armitage was skeptical about e-cigarettes as a way to stop smoking, saying he tried vaping several years ago but gave it up after experiencing twitching and shakes from nicotine withdrawal.

Also Read: Daily Cigarette Smoker Develop Greater Risks of Heart Attack, Says Study

`I tried it for a whole month, but it just wasn’t doing it for me,” said Armitage, an audio-visual technician in Washington. “I still wanted a cigarette afterward.”

Armitage, who has smoked for 15 years, said he also tried nicotine patches but found they irritated his skin. (VOA)