Monday April 6, 2020

Daily Exercise May Boost Better Lung Function Among Smokers

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries

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According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay
According to the researchers, leisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokers. Pixabay

If you are a smoker try doing regular physical activities as it may help you to have better lung function, a new study suggests.

“This result highlights the importance of physical activity among current smokers specifically, which are a group at higher risk of poor lung function,” said the lead author of the study Elaine Fuertes, a researcher from the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal).

“One possible explanation for this result may be that physical activity improves respiratory muscle endurance and strength via a short or moderate-term effect that requires sustained physical effort to maintain it,” Fuertes added.

ALSO READ: Pollution, the silent killer in metros; 35 per cent children in India have poor lung capacity 

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay
For the study, published in the journal Thorax, researchers used information collected from a long-standing collaboration between 25 European research centers in 11 countries. Pixabay

Over a 10-year period, 3,912 adults (aged between 27 to 57-years-old at the start of the study) were considered as being active if they exercised with a frequency of two or more times a week and a duration of one hour a week or more.

Associations between physical activity and lung function were only apparent among current smokers, suggesting the existence of an inflammation-related biological mechanism, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) May Combat Lung Function Decline in Women: Study

The researchers also found that participants who were active at the end of the study, either by becoming active or remaining active throughout, had significantly higher lung function than those consistently inactive.

“The results of this study strengthen the epidemiological evidence supporting an association between physical activity and respiratory health,” said co-author Judith Garcia-Aymerich, Head of the Non-Communicable Diseases and Environment Programme at ISGlobal.

“This evidence should be used to inform and support public health messages that promote increasing and maintaining physical activity as a way of preserving respiratory health in middle-aged adults,” Garcia-Aymerich noted.

Next Story

Sad People More Prone to Become Chain Smokers: Study

Participants had to abstain from smoking for at least eight hours (verified by carbon monoxide breath test)

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Smokers, Quit, Food
We found that the motivations for cigarettes, food and water do not interact very much. Pixabay

Sadness, and not all negative emotions, lead people to smoking and turn it into an addictive behaviour, a first-of-its-kind set of four inter-woven studies has revealed.

A team of researchers based at Harvard University discovered that sadness plays an especially strong role in triggering addictive behaviour relative to other negative emotions like disgust.

“The conventional wisdom in the field was that any type of negative feeling, whether it’s anger, disgust, stress, sadness, fear or shame, would make individuals more likely to use an addictive drug,” said lead researcher Charles A. Dorison, a Harvard Kennedy School doctoral candidate.

“Our work suggests that the reality is much more nuanced than the idea of ‘feel bad, smoke more.’ Specifically, we find that sadness appears to be an especially potent trigger of addictive substance use,” Dorison explained in a new report published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In the first study, researchers examined data from a national survey that tracked 10,685 people over 20 years.

They found that self-reported sadness among participants was associated with being a smoker and with relapsing back into smoking one and two decades later.

In the second study, the team tried to figure out whether sadness cause people to smoke, or were negative life events causing both sadness and smoking.

To test this, 425 smokers were recruited for an online study who watched video clips.

The findings showedthat individuals in the sadness condition – who watched the sad video and wrote about a personal loss – had higher cravings to smoke than both the neutral group and the disgust group.

Smoking
If you are a regular smoker, quit now as researchers have found that tobacco smoking may increase your risk of developing depression and schizophrenia. Pixabay

A similar approach in the third study measured actual impatience for cigarette puffs rather than mere self-reported craving.

Similar to the second study, nearly 700 participants watched videos and wrote about life experiences that were either sad or neutral.

Those in the sadness group proved to be more impatient to smoke sooner than those in the neutral group.

“The result built upon previous research findings that sadness increases financial impatience, measured with behavioural economics techniques,” the authors wrote.

The fourth study recruited 158 smokers to test how sadness influenced actual smoking behaviour.

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Participants had to abstain from smoking for at least eight hours (verified by carbon monoxide breath test).

They were randomly assigned to sadness or neutral control groups.

The results: smokers in the sadness condition made more impatient choices and smoked greater volumes per puff.

“We believe that theory-driven research could help shed light on how to address this epidemic,” Dorison said. (IANS)