Monday October 22, 2018

Dance Steps May Fix Urine Leakage!

Dancing gives women confidence, as they have to move their legs quickly to keep up with the choreography in the video game while controlling their urine, added the study

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Dance Steps May Fix Urine Leakage!
Dance Steps May Fix Urine Leakage! Pixabay
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Studies have shown that dance can help you stay in shape, reduce stress, make friends and more. Now, it may also help you prevent urine leakage!

For senior women suffering from urinary incontinence, dance helps them contract their pelvic floor muscles when they perform any daily activity to prevent urine leakage, says a promising study.

For the study, the researchers at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal in Canada and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich added a series of dance exercises via a video game console to a physiotherapy programme for pelvic floor muscles.

The researchers picked 24 elderly women for the study. The results post-dance sessions were promising.

“Out team registered a greater decrease in daily urine leakage than for the usual programme, no dropouts from the programme and a higher weekly participation rate,” said Chantal Dumoulin, associate professor in the physiotherapy programme at Université de Montréal.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

According to the researchers, fun is a recipe for success.

“Compliance with the programme is a key success factor. The more you practice, the more you strengthen your pelvic floor muscles,” said Eling D de Bruin, researcher at the department of health sciences and technology at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

The challenge was to motivate women to show up each week. The dance component was the part that the women found most fun and did not want to miss. They laughed a lot as they danced, said the study published in the journal Neurourology and Urodynamics.

Dancing gives women confidence, as they have to move their legs quickly to keep up with the choreography in the video game while controlling their urine, added the study.

“They now know they can contract their pelvic floor muscles when they perform any daily activity to prevent urine leakage. These exercises are therefore more functional,” said Dumoulin.  (IANS)

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Video- “Dancing Aunties” Take Over Public Places in China

Over 240 million Chinese are 60 or older, a number expected to double by 2050

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China's "Dancing Aunties" waltz to Healthy Lifestyle.

In a sparkling white cap and oversized sunglasses, 55-year-old retiree Zhang Yongli and dozens of neighbours liven up a Shanghai park by doing the jitterbug, part of a public dance craze that has become China national pastime.

Every day, an estimated more than 100 million people — dubbed “dancing aunties“ as they are primarily older women — take over squares and parks to tango, waltz, and grind out everything from flamenco to Chinese traditional dance.

Complaints over speakers blaring late at night have ensued. But toes are tapping to an ever-quickening beat as “square dancing” — as it is known in China — booms.

Teams are competing in dance-offs featuring thousands of contestants, while a thriving market of dance-related paraphernalia and mobile apps catches the attention of the business world. Even the government has jumped on the bandwagon to extol the health benefits.

“Square dancing happens wherever there is a square,” said Wang Guangcheng, a fitness instructor and choreographer who helps the government devise dance routines and is widely known as China’s “Square Dance Prince”.

Over 240 million Chinese are 60 or older, a number expected to double by 2050.

Zhang “was sitting at home, doing nothing” after retiring five years ago undergoing treatment for diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol.

 “Since I started dancing, my (health) indicators are now normal. I no longer need medication,” she said.
 A 2016 national fitness plan stresses “square dancing” as a team sport to be “vigorously developed” and last year it became an official event at China’s National Games.
Shanghai retiree Li Zhenhua‘s team worked with a professional instructor for weeks, enduring the winter chill and the summer heat of their local square to train for a months-long citywide contest that culminated in August.
The team, drawn mostly from China‘s ethnic Korean minority, took the title with their traditional Korean dances, beating out 750 other troupes. But it has really taken off lately as an increasingly prosperous China finds more leisure time, and nearly every neighbourhood park or square today is enlivened by dancers availing themselves of the free exercise.

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