Friday August 23, 2019

Dangerously High Temperatures in United States could Quickly Cause Heat Stress

The NWS advises people to check in on relatives and friends, especially the elderly

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Temperature, United States, Heat Stress
Tourists gather around the Capitol pond with the Washington Monument in the background on a hot day in Washington, DC as temperature rises into the upper 80s Fahrenheit, Friday, July 19, 2019. (Photo by Diaa Bekheet). VOA

The National Weather Service warned that dangerously high temperatures and humidity in the United States over the weekend could quickly cause heat stress or heat stroke, if precautions are not taken. The NWS advises people to check in on relatives and friends, especially the elderly.

Temperatures have been rising in cities from the Midwest to the East Coast because of a high pressure system that has trapped the  warm air.  City officials are allowing public pools to stay open longer and municipalities are issuing advisories to inform the public about how best to deal with the heat.

Forecasters say temperatures in New York City will reach 33 degrees Celsius Saturday, but with the humidity, it will feel like 43 degrees Celsius.

Saturday in the nation’s capital will reach 38 degrees Celsius and Philadelphia will go up to 36 degrees Celsius.

Temperature, United States, Heat Stress
The National Weather Service warned that dangerously high temperatures and humidity in the United States over the weekend could quickly cause heat stress or heat stroke. Pixabay

The World Meteorological Organization says June 2019 was the planet’s warmest month ever. In addition, both land and sea temperatures set record highs in June.

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June was also Europe’s hottest June on record, according to the WMO. Greenland, Alaska and parts of South America, Africa and Asia had temperatures substantially above normal in June, according to the WMO.  The organization said India and Pakistan experienced a severe heatwave in the early part of June, before the onset of the monsoon season. (VOA)

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IDC Says Huawei’s Temporary Reprieve Decision Depends on US Tech Firms

The US put Huawei in an Entity List in May which barred the US tech firms from selling components to Huawei without a special license

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The President of USA insisted that the Chinese company was a threat to national security. Pixabay

Whether the US decides to extend the temporary reprieve that it granted to Huawei, allowing it to do business in the US, may depend a lot on what the American tech firms have to say on the issue, according to research firm International Data Corporation (IDC).

“This is about, in my opinion, as much about the pressure that US components suppliers are exerting on the government as opposed to say punishing Huawei,” CNBC quoted Crawford Del Prete, President at IDC, as saying.

The US put Huawei in an Entity List in May which barred the US tech firms from selling components to Huawei without a special license.

The US government, however, later removed some of the restrictions for a period of three months. The temporary reprieve granted to Huawei is set to end on Monday.

US President Donald Trump on Sunday cast doubt on the possibility of conducting any kind of business with Huawei.

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The temporary reprieve granted to Huawei is set to end on Monday. Pixabay

“Huawei is a company we may not do business with at all,” Efe news quoted Trump as saying to the media on Sunday before departing from Morristown, New Jersey.

The President insisted that the Chinese company was a threat to national security.

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China on Monday urged Trump to allow companies in America to do business with Huawei.

“During the Chinese and US presidents’ meeting in Osaka, the US said it will allow US companies to supply Huawei. When and how will it honour its commitments? Concerns the US’ own reputation and credibility,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang said in Beijing. (IANS)