Saturday April 20, 2019

DASH Diet May Reduce Depression Risk

People in the two groups that followed the DASH diet most closely were less likely to develop depression than people in the group that did not follow the diet closely

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Depression

People who eat vegetables, fruits, and whole grains to reduce hypertension may also have lower rates of depression over time, a new study suggests.

The study found that people whose diets adhered more closely to the “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH) diet was less likely to develop depression than people who did not closely follow the diet.

Dash diets emphasize on receiving a proper amount of food and nutrients like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains along with low or fat-free dairy, fish, poultry, beans, seeds, and nuts.

ALSO READ: 5 Things You Can do to Treat Your Depression Instantly

“Depression is common in older adults and more frequent in people with memory problems, vascular risk factors such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or people who have had a stroke,” said co-author Laurel Cherian, from the Rush University Medical Centre in Chicago.

Depression
For the study, people were monitored for symptoms of depression such as being bothered by things that usually didn’t affect them and feeling hopeless about the future.

For the study, to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, 964 participants with an average age of 81 were evaluated yearly for an average of six-and-a-half years.

ALSO READ: Here is a List of Food to Counter Depression and Stress: Try them out!

They also filled out questionnaires about how often they ate various foods.

Participants were divided into three groups based on how closely they adhered to the diets.

People in the two groups that followed the DASH diet most closely were less likely to develop depression than people in the group that did not follow the diet closely.

The odds of becoming depressed over time was 11 percent lower among the top group of DASH adherers versus the lowest group. On the other hand, the more closely people followed a western diet — a diet that is high in saturated fats and red meats and low in fruits and vegetables — the more likely they were to develop depression. (IANS)

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Regular Intake of Sleeping Pills Can Adversely Effect Blood Pressure

The team suggested that sleeping pill use may be an indicator of a future need for greater hypertension treatment and the need to investigate underlying sleep disorders or unhealthy lifestyles that may contribute to hypertension.

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blood pressure
According to the study, published in the journal Geriatrics & Gerontology International, using sleeping pills on a regular basis is linked to the use of an increasing number of blood pressure medications over time. Pixabay

Be cautious if you use sleeping pills regularly as a new study has found that it may impact blood pressure (BP) in older adults.

According to the study, published in the journal Geriatrics & Gerontology International, using sleeping pills on a regular basis is linked to the use of an increasing number of blood pressure medications over time.

“Previous reports on associations of sleep characteristics with blood pressure and hypertension were focused on middle-aged adults; however, these associations were absent or inconsistent among older adults,” said senior author José Banegas from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Spain.

Depression
Consumption of sleeping pills was prospectively linked to an increased number of antihypertensive drugs, the team said. VOA

For the study, the research team involved 752 older adults with hypertension followed from 2008-2010 through 2012-2013.

According to the researchers, the analyses were carried out with logistic regression, and adjusted for demographics, lifestyle, comorbidity, baseline number of antihypertensive drugs and hypertension control.

During the follow-up period, 156 patients increased the number of antihypertensive drugs. No association was found between sleep duration or quality and the change in antihypertensive drug use.

sleep
The team suggested that sleeping pill use may be an indicator of a future need for greater hypertension treatment and the need to investigate underlying sleep disorders or unhealthy lifestyles that may contribute to hypertension. Pixabay

Consumption of sleeping pills was prospectively linked to an increased number of antihypertensive drugs, the team said.

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The team suggested that sleeping pill use may be an indicator of a future need for greater hypertension treatment and the need to investigate underlying sleep disorders or unhealthy lifestyles that may contribute to hypertension.

Earlier, a study, published in the journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, warned that regular intake of certain sleeping pills may be associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. (IANS)