Monday February 18, 2019

DASH Diet May Reduce Depression Risk

People in the two groups that followed the DASH diet most closely were less likely to develop depression than people in the group that did not follow the diet closely

0
//
Depression

People who eat vegetables, fruits, and whole grains to reduce hypertension may also have lower rates of depression over time, a new study suggests.

The study found that people whose diets adhered more closely to the “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH) diet was less likely to develop depression than people who did not closely follow the diet.

Dash diets emphasize on receiving a proper amount of food and nutrients like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains along with low or fat-free dairy, fish, poultry, beans, seeds, and nuts.

ALSO READ: 5 Things You Can do to Treat Your Depression Instantly

“Depression is common in older adults and more frequent in people with memory problems, vascular risk factors such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or people who have had a stroke,” said co-author Laurel Cherian, from the Rush University Medical Centre in Chicago.

Depression
For the study, people were monitored for symptoms of depression such as being bothered by things that usually didn’t affect them and feeling hopeless about the future.

For the study, to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, 964 participants with an average age of 81 were evaluated yearly for an average of six-and-a-half years.

ALSO READ: Here is a List of Food to Counter Depression and Stress: Try them out!

They also filled out questionnaires about how often they ate various foods.

Participants were divided into three groups based on how closely they adhered to the diets.

People in the two groups that followed the DASH diet most closely were less likely to develop depression than people in the group that did not follow the diet closely.

The odds of becoming depressed over time was 11 percent lower among the top group of DASH adherers versus the lowest group. On the other hand, the more closely people followed a western diet — a diet that is high in saturated fats and red meats and low in fruits and vegetables — the more likely they were to develop depression. (IANS)

Next Story

Deficiency of Zinc May up Hypertension

Understanding the specific mechanisms by which zinc deficiency contributes to blood pressure dysregulation may have an important effect on the treatment of hypertension in chronic disease settings, the team noted

0
'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study
'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study. Flickr

Lower-than-normal levels of zinc — a nutrient that helps the immune system fight off invading bacteria and viruses — may contribute to hypertension, finds a new study on mice.

The study, from the Wright State University in the US, demonstrated that the way in which the kidneys either excrete sodium into the urine or reabsorb it into the body — specifically through a pathway called the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) — also plays a role in controlling high blood pressure.

Zinc deficiency is common in people with illnesses such as Type-2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

It also showed that less sodium in the urine typically corresponds with higher blood pressure.

Zinc may help regulate proteins that in turn regulate the NCC, the study suggested.

For the study, researchers compared male mice with zinc deficiency to healthy controls with normal zinc levels.

Representational image. Pixabay

The results, published in the American Journal of Physiology — Renal Physiology, showed that zinc-deficient mice developed high blood pressure and a corresponding decrease in urinary sodium excretion.

However, the control group did not experience the same changes.

A small group of the zinc-deficient mice were fed a zinc-rich diet partway. Once the animals’ zinc reached adequate levels, blood pressure began to drop and urinary sodium levels increased.

Also Read- Afghanistan Launches Polio Vaccination Campaign in High-risk Districts

“These significant findings demonstrate that enhanced renal (sodium) re-absorption plays a critical role in (zinc-deficiency)-induced hypertension,” said Clintoria R. Williams, a researcher from the varsity.

Understanding the specific mechanisms by which zinc deficiency contributes to blood pressure dysregulation may have an important effect on the treatment of hypertension in chronic disease settings, the team noted. (IANS)