Wednesday August 15, 2018
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Data Sharing Leads Mark Zuckerberg To Public Hearing

Zuckerberg will be invited to appear before the PJCIS in a public hearing

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Data Sharing Troubled Mark Zuckerberg, He Will Be Summoned
Data Sharing Troubled Mark Zuckerberg, He Will Be Summoned, Flickr
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Labor MP Anthony Byrne, deputy chair of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS), said Zuckerberg owes an explanation to Australian Facebook users, reports Efe news.

“It is vital that Facebook explains its data sharing partnership with firms such as Huawei. We need to protect the data of over 15 million Facebook users in Australia,” Byrne posted on his Facebook page on Thursday.

“If need be, Mr Zuckerberg will be invited to appear before the PJCIS in a public hearing to explain himself to our committee and the Australian people.”

It was revealed on Wednesday that Facebook had admitted giving Huawei and three other Chinese companies – Lenovo, OPPO and TCL – specialised access to user data.

Maurice Levy & Mark Zukerberg
Maurice Levy & Mark Zukerberg, flickr

Also read: Apple requested zero personal data deals Facebook CEO Tim Cook says

In recent years, US senators and national security officials have warned of the possibility of the Chinese government having access to Huawei servers. (IANS)

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Rare Indigenous Australian Bird is Left with Only 12 Breeding Pairs

Conserving the ground-nesting birds is important as there are only 12 breeding pairs left.

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beach stone-curlew bird
Beach stone-curlew bird. Flickr

The last 12 breeding pairs of the beach stone-curlew bird indigenous to the Australaia region are under threat from feral foxes in New South Wales (NSW).

The aboriginal community in the coastal bushland has now taken up action to protect the rare birds by laying fox traps, Xinhua news agency reported.

Also Read: Researchers Explain How They Tracked Migrating Birds

Conserving the ground-nesting birds is important as there are only 12 breeding pairs left, said Banahm Slabb from the Tweed Byron Aboriginal Land Council.

The foxes were first introduced Down Under from Europe in the mid-1800s for sport hunting. Later they proliferated on minimal competition and have now started affecting native species. (IANS)

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