Saturday January 18, 2020
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Claims, Data Storing Call Comes With Risk in India

"Our stance on data localisation is a risk. That is, if we get blocked in a major country, that will hurt our community and our business. But our principles on data localization aren't new and this has always been a risk," the Facebook CEO added.

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Mark Zuckerberg
Stopping abuse is certainly important, but, said Zuckerberg, "I would argue that, even more, the deeper question: Is that the intrinsic design of the systems, right?" VOA

 India’s data localisation demands are understandable but allowing it for one nation can trigger a demand from countries which are much more authoritarian and can misuse the citizens’ data, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said.

In a conversation with historian and author Yuval Noah Harari on Friday, Zuckerberg said the motives and intents behind storing data locally matter the most.

“I think that… the motives matter and certainly, I don’t think that either of us would consider India to be an authoritarian country,” Zuckerberg responded to a question why is it safe to store the data about Indian citizens in the US and not in India when they’re openly saying they care only about themselves.

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The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) guidelines say that all digital payment firms like Google Pay, WhatsApp and others must store data locally for their businesses. Pixabay

“The intent matters, right. And I think countries can come at this with open values and still conclude that something like that could be helpful.

“But I think one of the things that you need to be very careful about is that if you set that precedent you’re making it very easy for other countries that don’t have open values and that are much more authoritarian and want the data not to protect their citizens but to be able to surveil them and find dissidents and lock them up,” Zuckerberg emphasised.

In an earlier earnings call with investors, he said that Facebook won’t store sensitive data in countries where it might be improperly accessed.

“More countries following the approach of authoritarian regimes adopting strict data localization policies where governments can more easily access people’s data, and I’m highly concerned about that future,” he noted.

“Our stance on data localisation is a risk. That is, if we get blocked in a major country, that will hurt our community and our business. But our principles on data localization aren’t new and this has always been a risk,” the Facebook CEO added.

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In a conversation with historian and author Yuval Noah Harari on Friday, Zuckerberg said the motives and intents behind storing data locally matter the most. Pixabay

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) guidelines say that all digital payment firms like Google Pay, WhatsApp and others must store data locally for their businesses.

In the conversation with Harari, he said that Facebook needs to build up really advanced systems for detecting interference in the democratic process and more broadly being able to identify that.

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“The idea is to identify when people are standing up networks of fake accounts that are not behaving in a way that normal people would, to be able to weed those out and work with law enforcement and election commissions and folks all around the world and the intelligence community to be able to coordinate and be able to deal with that effectively,” Zuckerberg noted.

Stopping abuse is certainly important, but, said Zuckerberg, “I would argue that, even more, the deeper question: Is that the intrinsic design of the systems, right?” (IANS)

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Web Cookies Double ad Revenue For Publishers Online: Tech Report

According to the study, there is a 52 percent reduction in advertising revenue to publishers when cookies are eliminated through Internet user opt-out protocols

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Web cookies nearly double ad revenue for online publishers leading to profits. Pixabay

Irritating for users most of the times, web cookies nearly double ad revenue for online publishers and if users decide to opt out of online ads, there is over 50 per cent reduction in advertising revenue, new research has found.

A computer cookie, also known as a web cookie, Internet cookie or browser cookie, represents data packets that are sent to your computer to help a website track your visits and activity.

As a result, the site is better able to track items in your shopping cart when browsing an ecommerce site, or personalize your user experience on the website so that you are more likely to see content and ads you want to see.

Researchers from Boston University, Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado and Shaoyin Du of University of Rochester explored the real value of the cookie to websites, advertisers, and found that cookies represent higher revenue to online publishers.

According to the study, there is a 52 percent reduction in advertising revenue to publishers when cookies are eliminated through Internet user opt-out protocols. On the other hand, when cookies are present, publishers’ ad pricing doubles.

The study, to be published in the journal Marketing Science is authored by Garrett Johnson of Questrom School of Business at Boston University; Scott Shriver of the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado; and Shaoyin Du of the Simon Business School at the University of Rochester.

According to them, while most Americans decide not to opt-out of online advertising, 0.23 per cent of American online ad impressions arise from users who decide to opt out of online ads. These users, in effect, have opted out of the use of cookies to track their online navigation of a particular site.

Cookies, Internet, Background, Pay, Matrix, Networking
Computer cookies, also known as web cookies, Internet cookies or browser cookies, represent data packets that are sent to your computer to help a website track your visits and activity. Pixabay

The authors calculated that the inability to behaviorally target opt-out users results in a loss of roughly $8.58 in ad spending per American opt-out consumer. “Though few users tend to opt out, we note that certain types of users are more likely to opt out, and that has certain consequences for the advertising industry,” said Du.

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“We find that opt-out rates are higher among users who install non-default browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome, which tells us that opt-out users are likely more technologically sophisticated. We also note substantial variation in opt-out rates by region by city and state and by certain demographics,” Du informed. (IANS)