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Deadpool 2 is Coming Back and the Storyline is ‘So Different From What Anyone Can Imagine!’, Says Deadpool’s ‘Dopinder’ Karan Soni | Deadpool 2 Releases on June 1, 2018

Based on Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, “Deadpool” is the original story of a former Special Forces operative who turns into a mercenary to seek revenge against the man who nearly destroyed his life

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Deadpool
Deadpool 2 is slated to release on June 1, 2018. Pixabay

Los Angeles, September 19, 2017 : Karan Soni, who featured as an Indian cab driver in Ryan Reynolds’ “Deadpool”, will be back as Dopinder in the second part of the superhero film. The actor, with roots back to India, says the storyline is very different from “what anyone can imagine”.

The actor also mentioned that his role in the upcoming film is meatier than the first part.

“I can’t say that (about what to expect from the film) because I don’t want to tell you the story. We are half-way done. I will say (that my role in ‘Deadpool 2’) is way more than the first one. So, that is very exciting,” Karan told IANS over phone from Los Angeles.

“In the first movie, I worked on it for three weeks and for this movie I am working for about seven or eight weeks. It is almost like double the amount of time I am spending on the sets,” he added.

Deadpool
Karan Soni. Wikimedia

The film tells the story of an adult superhero with a twisted sense of humour. Karan featured as Dopinder, who took relationship advice from Deadpool. His role was small, but it didn’t go unnoticed.

Based on Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, “Deadpool” is the original story of a former Special Forces operative who turns into a mercenary and is now out to seek revenge against the man who nearly destroyed his life. The film is slated to release on June 1, 2018.

“The storyline is so different from what anyone can imagine. Even I was shocked and couldn’t believe that I am getting to do all these things. I think my character is also kind of shocked that he is getting to do all those things.

“It has been fun and I am excited to see the response because there is no way they (audience) are going to expect what is going to happen,” he added.

There was a Bollywood twist in “Deadpool” in 2016 too, with songs like “Mera joota hai japani” featuring in the opening credit, and “Tumse achha kaun hai” also finding a place in the narrative.

Asked about any other Bollywood song being used in “Deadpool 2”, Karan said: “There is another Indian song in the film, which my character is listening to.”

Karan said that it is hard to tell if the scene will make it after the final edit.

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“It is very hard to say (whether it will be in the final version). But we have shot where I’m listening to another Bollywood song, hopefully that will make it to the final movie.”

Born and brought up in Delhi, Karan went to study in the University of South California, but found a way into the showbiz. He has featured in projects like “Safety Not Guaranteed”, “The Neighbors”, “Goosebumps”, “Ghostbusters” and an episode of “Room 104”, aired in India on Star World Premiere HD.

Karan says he never got a role based on an Indian stereotype in the West.

“I could never get cast with an Indian accent. I was not getting cast. When I have done jobs with an Indian accent, I was mad because I got offended thinking that ‘is an Indian actor not good enough’,” he said, adding that this problem exists for “brown actors who have more to do with drama”.

“I didn’t do a lot of drama and decided to do comedy, so I never used to get those terrorist audition and stuff. But I do know a lot of people who in the beginning got that kind of stuff,” he added. (IANS)

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Ram and Ravana Have More In Common Than You Think : 5 Traits of the Anti-Hero Ravana That You Must Learn | Dussehra Special

An individual who questions principles, assumptions and values is always painted dark. I believe Ravan was one of them.

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Have you ever noticed how we have more in common with Ravana than Lord Ram? Wikimedia

New Delhi, September 30, 2017 : Happy Dussehra or Vijaydashmi – the day we all rejoice the defeat of the evil Lanka Naresh Ravana by Shri Ram. But the essence of the festival is much more than plain revenge. We have been told since times immemorial that the festival symbolizes the triumph of truth over deception and good over evil; the victory of Lord Ram (who we must aspire to be) over the evil Ravana (who should be despised). But is that all there is to devour from the epic?

Lord Ram is held in reverence across the country and is seen as the ultimate role model. Popularly addressed as ‘Maryada Purushottam’, we have all, at a point, aimed to inculcate similar traits in our life.  But do we truly aspire to live a Ram-like life? If your answer to that question is in the affirmation, what are you doing to lead a life defined with such high morale and ideals?

We Have More In Common With Ravana Than Ram

‘Respect your parents’, ‘One must not steal’, ‘Do not lie’, ‘Honesty is the best policy’.

Despite being repeatedly exposed to these virtues, we are still dishonest.

Lord Ram, who we aspire to be, supposedly never lied.

The veneration with which the Raghuvansham looked up to his parents is not only impossible to trace in the present day, but also hard to emulate.

An epitome of ethical demeanor and exemplary disciple, are we as devoted as Ram?

This brings me to a larger question.

Have you ever noticed how we have more in common with Ravana than Lord Ram?

Maybe because it is easy to be a Ravana today, than be the ideal Ram.

So, this Dussehra, as people from all across India burn effigies of Ravana as part of the popular ritual, let us dig a little deeper and introspect what makes the anti-hero, Ravana so special and traits we can learn from his life,

What Can We Learn From Ravana

  1. Undying Faith and Devotion

Ravana performed an extreme repentance (or tapasya) to appease Shiva that lasted for tens of thousands years.

During his atonement, Ravana sacrificed his head for the sake of Shiva and chopped it off 10 different times. Each time he cut his head off, another head emerged, hence empowering him to proceed with his repentance. Finally, satisfied with his severity, Shiva showed up after his tenth beheading and rewarded him a boon of heavenly nectar of eternality.

King Ravana
Ten-headed Ravana. Wikimedia

Ravana additionally requested for supremacy over divine beings, heavenly spirits, different rakshas, and serpents which was granted by Shiva along with his 10 severed heads and an incredible knowledge of heavenly weapons and magic.

  1.  Knowledge

Ravana was the grandson of Brahma, the creator of the universe, the son of sage Vishrava and a sibling of Kubera, the god of riches.

He himself was an exceptional researcher and was learned in Ayurveda, political science and the ways of the Kshatriyas (warriors). His ten heads are known to speak of his insight into the Shastras and the four Vedas A great Veena player, he additionally wrote several books and verses on medicine and composed the Ravana Samhita, a book on Hindu astrology and the Arka Prakasham.

This highlights that despite your ill-deeds, knowledge can win you laurels, even from your staunchest rivals.

  1. Indomitable Leadership

Valmiki recognized Ravana as an exceptionally proficient and just ruler.

Ravana emerged victorious in the battle against the demon king Sumali and assumed control and administration over Lanka, thus gaining the title of ‘Lanka Naresh’. Under his reign, the kingdom came to be known as ‘Sone ki Lanka’ (kingdom of gold) and witnessed the most prosperous and magnanimous period in its history.

Ravana was a minding ruler, who cared for his subjects well. It was only under his rule and guidance that the kingdom, constricted by Vishwakarma, the best of all architects, flourished.

ALSO READ Ramayana : 6 Timeless Management Lessons From the Ancient Hindu Text that You Must Im

  1. Ambition and Belief in Self

After his penance to Lord Shiva, Ravana had wished for supremacy over divine beings, heavenly spirits, different rakshas, and serpents. Maintaining conviction in himself and his abilities, he wanted to emerge victorious and preside over all three worlds. He also fought a series of wars and lost only four times. Ravana also defeated Sumali, the demon king and established control over Lanka.

This tells us that ambition is the key to progress. Without ambition, men would have not discovered wheels, horse carts or chariots, magnificent cities, temples and palaces, or majestic sailing ships. Absence of ambition means an absence of growth.

  1. Staying True to Oneself

Ravana wanted to emerge as the greatest ruler, however, he did not aspire to become ‘God’ or attain moksha.

In response to the great king Mahabali who advised Ravana to shun malice and greed, the Lanka Naresh told him that he would never strive to be a God and shall live like a man and die as one too. Ravana lived exactly as his emotions guided him and did not aim to be a role model for the generations to follow.

This brings forth Ravana’s conviction to live our life to its full and die as a man should, staying true to one’s character and never once aiming to be godly.

Ravana
Ravana’s story is a testament that a single vice in character is sufficient to drag you to your end. Wikimedia

Ram And Ravana Had More In Common Than You Think

Most of us believe Ravana to be an evil rakshas. However, a deeper understanding of the Hindu mythology and its characters reveal that both Ram and Ravana had traits that one must aspire to imbibe.

Throughout the epic, both Ram and Ravana demonstrated outrageous determination in following their convictions, regardless of what they were to face thereafter.  Yet, we only address Ram as the Lord while look at Ravana as an evil force, despite recognizing (however not truly accepting) his traits.

Ram battled with valor against all dangers, until the point he delivered justice for all the wrong that was done to him. Similarly, Ravana remained loyal to his choices (abduction of Sita) and its consequences till his final breath.

In his quest to bring his wife back, Ram fought battles, meandered for miles, and even clashed with the gods of the oceans. Despite all intricacies, what guided Lord Ram to ultimate victory was his determination. Similarly, Ravana (and Shiva) proliferated the best hypothesis of modern humanism “Atma so paramatma” which says there is no more noteworthy power than human fortitude.

Ram touched the hearts of many upon his chance meeting with Shabri and preached lessons of equality and moving beyond barriers of caste upon consumption of her half-consumed berries. In the same manner, the Raksh tribe also proposed faith in nature-worship and universal identity with no predisposition for caste, creed or gender. In fact, Ravan also propagated the ‘Raksh neeti’ which implied equality for all.

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The world largely celebrates Ramayana as a battle the Raghuvansham fought in wife Sita’s esteem. Tales of Lord Ram’s reverence towards his mothers and the female clan in general have been cited across generations that earned him the title of the ‘Maryada Purushottam’.

Ravana
Battle between Ram and Ravana. Wikimedia

In a similar manner, Ravan avenged the disrespect given to his sister Shurpanka by abducting Sita. However, he did not ill-treat her, and instead kept her with dignity in the Ashok Vatika.

These instances draw attention to one of the traits of human sociology – an individual who questions principles, assumptions and values is always painted dark. I believe Ravan was one of them.

Maybe over the years, Ramayana has been over-simplified, and consequently, a little misinterpreted.  I believe a lot can be learnt from both, the hero and the anti-hero of the epic.

 

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Spectacular demand for dubbed entertainment in India

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Chennai: Sashi Kumar and his writers’ team said there is a spectacular demand for dubbed entertainment in the country. Earlier they have also lent the magic of words to the trailer of the Tamil and Telugu dubbed versions of Ryan Reynolds-starrer “Deadpool”.

Sashi represents Sound and Vision India, the country’s biggest film dubbing company.

“The demand for dubbed English films in the regional market is amazing. Films that get dubbed in Tamil and Telugu have resulted in the exceptional increase in numbers for studios from markets they never anticipated can yield such returns,” Sashi, who supervises dubbing of films into Tamil and Telugu, said.

The idea of localising Hollywood content has clicked with the masses, says Mona Shetty, President, Sound and Vision India.

“Hollywood films are made for a different set of audience. The only way it can relate to the masses here is when it is localised in terms of language,” said Mona, adding that among the regional markets, content dubbed in Telugu is received very well.

Citing some examples, Shetty said films such as “Furious 7”, “Jurassic Park” and “Avatar” have done exceptional business in the Tamil and Telugu versions.

The process of dubbing, for many, may come across as an easy job. Sashi, however, begs to differ.

“It is very challenging. Films that are dubbed usually appeal to the audience in B and C centres. One needs to know the pulse of such people, understand what they like and what kind of jokes they enjoy,” he said.

Referring to the Tamil trailer of “Deadpool”, which has turned out to be a hit on social media, Sashi said dubbing doesn’t mean literal translation of dialogues into another language.

“The dubbing process involves one to be very subtle. The jokes that worked in English won’t work in Tamil when merely translated. It only works when

you get creative, when you bring some local flavour, improvise while dubbing so that the quirky lines from the original work,” he said.

Dubbing “Deadpool” into Tamil and Telugu wasn’t a cakewalk, admits Sashi.

“Unlike regular action films, this one is high on comedy, interspersed with plenty of one-liners. I had to sit and brainstorm with my team of writers and give options for the producers to choose from. It took us about a month to complete the whole dubbing process,” he added.

The other factor that had to be kept in mind was choosing the right voice for Ryan Reynolds, who plays a superhero in the film.

“If the voice doesn’t suit the actor, the audience won’t relate to the character. Dubbing artist P R  Shekhar, who has over 200 films to his credit, dubbed for Ryan Reynolds. It suited his personality and the character,” he said.(IANS)(image: dighist.fas.harvard.edu)

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Women in Refrigerators: Female characters in superhero films, a feminist outlook

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By Atul Mishra

What does a Black Widow bring to the table? What’s Scarlett Johansson’s reel role in The Avengers? Is Rachel of Dark Knight a damsel in distress? Where is Spiderwoman or Batwoman? We hear of the superheroes, but we don’t often hear about super-heroines. There have been all those men like Batman, Superman and Spiderman. Why didn’t anybody (and hasn’t hitherto) write or film women like Batwoman, Superwoman or Spiderwoman?

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Luce Irigaray, Belgian-born French feminist, argued in When ‘Goods Get Together’ that sexuality and the patriarchal machismo that’s inherently been so obvious in our society is legitimately nothing but a transaction. 6301704418_eae771570f_oThe phallocentric divide rivers down to a profit-loss statement. This happens in the film fraternity as well. Some characters have phallus, others don’t. The ones who don’t are aces in the deck of film cards, merely there to sexualize the script.

This has been perpetually present in the movies as well. There have been many female characters alongside our superheroes merely to facilitate the script and monetary credentials attached with the fraternity. As Gayatri C. Spivak asks, “Can the subaltern speak?” The reality of these female characters is that they are subalterns. They don’t really have a voice. Rachel in Batman is a damsel in distress, defined only by her relationships with the men in movie. Mary Jane in Spiderman has to be saved by his Man like the Castle of Otranto. There is a lack of agency attached with the female characters which make them subjugated when juxtaposed with larger than life superheroes. So why have these characters? Probably the Irigaray argument comes into play here that non-phallic human characters are a tool of transaction. Giving a physical reality to these characters like say Scarlett Johansson playing the Black Widow is a way to glue audiences to their seats. No doubt sexuality is the most appealing thing in a heteronormative hegemonic patriarchal culture. The result of this discourse then weakens the already weak character and the actor. But the magic of physicality and sexuality still works on the screen.

Gayatri C. Spivak
Gayatri C. Spivak

Drawing along these feminist lines, Bechdel test comes into mind. As a fact, any fictional work that has at least two female characters who talk about something other than man passes the Bechdel test. Most of the superhero movies fail this test. A few like Thor and Catwoman just passed but most of the others including Spiderman series, Batman series, Avengers and Hulk have failed the Bechdel test.

Even the movie posters have the male machismo angle attached to them. All the theatrical posters of superhero movies have those hulky-bulky-clad-in-a-particular-glaring-costume heroes. The females are subjugated even in the posters let alone the screen and script. So the stern and gloomy reality check of the portrayal of female characters in superhero movies is that first there are dominantly only superheroes and not super-heroines and moreover the grim echelon ascends due to the realization of weak female characters portrayed alongside the Achilles of silver screen.

nemas_supergirl_by_slippyninjaLaura Mulvey, the British feminist film theorist, says- “In film, women  are typically the objects, rather than the possessors, of gaze because the control  of the camera (and thus the gaze) comes from factors such as the assumption of  heterosexual men as the default target audience for most film genres. Women  are the bearer of meaning, not the maker of meaning.”

All this portrayal is also mainly because most of the superhero films have been directed by male directors, be it Niblo and Reed’s The Mark of Zorro or upcoming Snyder’s Dawn of Justice. So superhero films are actually men’s stories with hyper-sexualized women’s stories which make the latter a bearer of meaning and not its maker. The female portrayal can be seen as “women in refrigerators” and one of the stark contemporary examples is Rachel of The Dark Knight where she is murdered for the male’s storyline to progress and catapult the rage of male characters.