Monday January 20, 2020
Home Lead Story This Unique R...

This Unique Restaurant in China Appoints Only Deaf Waiters

From the ceiling hang posters with basic instructions on how to order food, ask for the bill and approach waiters, accompanied by drawings with the most basic gestures of sign language.

0
//
waiter
"I decided to open the restaurant not to turn it into a sales phenomenon, but to help them build their psychology and give them a sense of belonging," she continued. Pixabay

A restaurant in China’s capital is offering opportunities to people that are hard-of-hearing by employing a team of deaf waiters who communicate with customers aided by guide cards.

With a look of concentration and a timid smile on his face, Cao Xueting goes about serving food to diners in a quiet but determined manner and when asked about the menu, he quickly directs customers to some coloured cards, reports Efe news.

“It was a friend who showed me this place. Here, there are always a lot of people and it is a very good business,” 21-year-old Cao said using sign language.

Located in the artistic 798 district in northeastern Beijing, “Forgive Barbecue” is one of the few restaurants in China with deaf waiters who through these cards and simple facial expressions can work with ease.

Cao is part of a four-member team that carries out the work typical of any restaurant: to attend, serve, charge for the service and clean up, all done through sign and body language.

food
“The dishes are very delicious and the service is excellent,” said Yang, 19, who now admits to understanding the reality of people with disabilities better. Poxabay

The establishment opened its doors two summers ago, when its promoter Lu Lu decided to switch jobs from caring for children with special needs to launch a project that would include people with disabilities.

“In China, many children with disabilities do not find good jobs once they get older,” Lul Lu told Efe news.

“I decided to open the restaurant not to turn it into a sales phenomenon, but to help them build their psychology and give them a sense of belonging,” she continued.

Before starting work, all the waiters – whose ages range from 20 to 30 – underwent several months of training where, in addition to learning day-to-day tasks, they also gained self-confidence.

From the ceiling hang posters with basic instructions on how to order food, ask for the bill and approach waiters, accompanied by drawings with the most basic gestures of sign language.

In the background, a wall is filled with hundreds of pink post-it notes containing suggestions on how to express gratitude for the food to how to convey messages of support, designed for the customers to initiate exchanges with the hard of hearing staff.

Behind the counter, dressed in black and with a panoramic view of the premises is 26-year-old Xing Fangyuan who is in charge of sorting out any difficulties should they arise between patrons and waiters.

waiter
Before starting work, all the waiters – whose ages range from 20 to 30 – underwent several months of training where, in addition to learning day-to-day tasks, they also gained self-confidence. Pixabay

“At first I didn’t really know how to work with them, but I’ve been learning little by little,” said Xing who learnt sign language before starting work as the restaurant supervisor.

As for the patrons, their faces range from initial perplexity to a growing sense of curiosity that eventually leads many, like Yang Feifei, to repeat the experience a second time.

“The dishes are very delicious and the service is excellent,” said Yang, 19, who now admits to understanding the reality of people with disabilities better.

Also Read: Is NYAY Going To Be A Game Changer for Congress?

“I do not notice any difference between this and other restaurants,” Yand adds.

Lu plans to open another half-dozen similar restaurants in Beijing, of which at least one will include a small “experimental room” where diners can feel the same as a deaf person. (IANS)

Next Story

New Virus Can Spread Through Human Contact: China

China: Possible That New Virus Could Spread Between Humans

0
CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS
Security guards stand in front of the closed Huanan wholesale seafood market, where health authorities say a man who died from a respiratory illness had purchased goods from, in the city of Wuhan, Hubei province, China. VOA

The possibility that a new virus in central China could spread between humans cannot be ruled out, though the risk of transmission at the moment appears to be low, Chinese officials said Wednesday.

Forty-one people in the city of Wuhan have received a preliminary diagnosis of a novel coronavirus, a family of viruses that can cause both the common cold and more serious diseases. A 61-year-old man with severe underlying conditions died from the coronavirus on Saturday.

While preliminary investigations indicate that most of the patients had worked at or visited a particular seafood wholesale market, one woman may have contracted the virus from her husband, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission said in a public notice.

CHINA-HEALTH-VIRUS
Commuters wear protection masks inside a subway train in Hong Kong, China. VOA

The commission said the husband, who fell ill first, worked at the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market. Meanwhile, the wife said she hasn’t had any exposure to the market.

It’s possible that the husband brought home food from the market that then infected his wife, Hong Kong health official Chuang Shuk-kwan said at a news briefing. But because the wife did not exhibit symptoms until days after her husband, it’s also possible that he infected her.

Chuang and other Hong Kong health officials spoke to reporters Wednesday following a trip to Wuhan, where mainland Chinese authorities briefed them on the outbreak.

The threat of human-to-human transmission remains low, Chuang said, as hundreds of people, including medical professionals, have been in close contact with infected individuals and have not been infected themselves.

Also Read- Facebook Steps up Australia Bushfires Relief Efforts

She echoed Wuhan authorities’ assertion that there remains no definitive evidence of human-to-human transmission.

The outbreak in Wuhan has raised the specter of SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS is a type of coronavirus that first struck southern China in late 2002. It then spread to more than two dozen countries, killing nearly 800 people. (VOA)