Sunday November 18, 2018

Minimum Death Risk For Breast Cancer Patients From Heart Ailments

The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population

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Contrary to earlier findings, German researchers have concluded that there is no higher risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

In a largest cohort study evaluating data from almost 350,000 patients from the US cancer registries, the team found that the risk is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals, as well as control screenings at short intervals, seem to make up for elevated risks, said researchers from the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

Risk of death from heart ailments is less in women suffering from Breast Cancer.

“At first, we were also surprised by this result. But we assume that our study paints a more realistic picture of the actual situation of treatment than clinical trials,” said Janick Weberpals, the study’s initial author, in a paper published in the European Heart Journal.

Breast cancer is the second-most frequent cancer worldwide and the most common cancer in women. However, improved screening measures and more effective treatment methods have considerably lowered the risk of succumbing to the disease.

Also Read: Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

“However, a number of clinical trials have suggested that both chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with the risk of suffering heart disease as a consequence of treatment,” said Hermann Brenner from DKFZ.

Brenner’s team analysed cases of women who were diagnosed with breast cancer in the years 2000-2011 and subsequently received treatment by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population.

Breast cancer awareness is very important in India.

“We consider the result of our study to be very positive for the treatment of breast cancer,” said Brenner. “It is particularly good news for the large number of affected patients that if they are in good medical care and have survived breast cancer, they do not need to be more worried about deadly heart diseases than women at the same age without breast cancer,” the researchers added. IANS

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Women Rising Early Have Lower Risk of Breast Cancer

"In other words, it may not be the case that changing your habits changes your risk of breast cancer; it may be more complex than that," she noted

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Breast Cancer
Early rising women at lower risk of breast cancer: Study. Pixabay

Women who begin their day early are likely to have a lower of risk breast cancer, than late beginners, suggests a research.

The study found that a preference for mornings reduced the risk of breast cancer by 40 per cent compared with being an evening type.

It also found that women who slept longer than the recommended seven to eight hours had a 20 per cent increased risk of the disease per additional hour slept.

“The findings of a protective effect of morning preference on breast cancer risk in this study are consistent with previous research highlighting a role for night shift work and exposure to ‘light-at-night’ as risk factors for breast cancer,” said Rebecca Richmond, a research student in the Cancer Research UK.

“We know already that night shift work is associated with worse mental and physical health. This study provides further evidence to suggest disrupted sleep patterns may have a role in cancer development,” she added.

The results were presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow.

For the study, the team looked at data from 180,215 women, and 228,951 women part of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Using genetic variants associated with people’s preference for morning or evening, sleep duration and insomnia, they investigated whether these sleep traits have a causal contribution to the risk of developing breast cancer.

They also found some evidence for a causal effect of increased sleep duration and sleep fragmentation on breast cancer.

The researchers believe their findings have implications for policy-makers and employers.

Also Read- New Gene Responsible For Rare Genetic Hair Loss Discovered

“These findings have potential policy implications for influencing sleep habits of the general population in order to improve health and reduce risk of breast cancer among women,” Richmond said.

Richmond said: “We would like to do further work to investigate the mechanisms underpinning these results, as the estimates obtained are based on questions related to morning or evening preference rather than actually whether people get up earlier or later in the day.

“In other words, it may not be the case that changing your habits changes your risk of breast cancer; it may be more complex than that,” she noted. (IANS)