Sunday July 22, 2018

Minimum Death Risk For Breast Cancer Patients From Heart Ailments

The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population

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Contrary to earlier findings, German researchers have concluded that there is no higher risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

In a largest cohort study evaluating data from almost 350,000 patients from the US cancer registries, the team found that the risk is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals, as well as control screenings at short intervals, seem to make up for elevated risks, said researchers from the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

Risk of death from heart ailments is less in women suffering from Breast Cancer.

“At first, we were also surprised by this result. But we assume that our study paints a more realistic picture of the actual situation of treatment than clinical trials,” said Janick Weberpals, the study’s initial author, in a paper published in the European Heart Journal.

Breast cancer is the second-most frequent cancer worldwide and the most common cancer in women. However, improved screening measures and more effective treatment methods have considerably lowered the risk of succumbing to the disease.

Also Read: Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

“However, a number of clinical trials have suggested that both chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with the risk of suffering heart disease as a consequence of treatment,” said Hermann Brenner from DKFZ.

Brenner’s team analysed cases of women who were diagnosed with breast cancer in the years 2000-2011 and subsequently received treatment by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population.

Breast cancer awareness is very important in India.

“We consider the result of our study to be very positive for the treatment of breast cancer,” said Brenner. “It is particularly good news for the large number of affected patients that if they are in good medical care and have survived breast cancer, they do not need to be more worried about deadly heart diseases than women at the same age without breast cancer,” the researchers added. IANS

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Eating Dinner Early May Lower Risk of Breast, Prostate Cancer

The research suggests that long-term late night snacking may have the similar effect to night-shift work and circadian disruption

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The researchers found that cancer patients were more likely to have dinner late at night. Pixabay

Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer, suggests a new study.

Compared to those who have supper after 10 pm or those who go to bed right after meal, people who take their evening meal before 9 pm or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have approximately 20 per cent lower risk of those types of cancers, the findings showed.

“Our study concludes that adherence to diurnal eating patterns is associated with a lower risk of cancer,” said lead author Manolis Kogevinas from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in Spain.

“The findings highlight the importance of assessing circadian rhythms in studies on diet and cancer,” Kogevinas added.

For the study, published in International Journal of Cancer, the team analysed data from 621 cases of prostate cancer and 1,205 cases of breast cancer, as well as 872 male and 1,321 female controls.

Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer
Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Pixabay

The participants, were interviewed about their meal timing, sleep habits and chronotype — an individual attribute correlating with preference for morning or evening activity.

The participants also completed a questionnaire on their eating habits and adherence to cancer prevention recommendations.

The researchers found that cancer patients were more likely to have dinner late at night.

Also Read: Meditation Improves Mood, Sleep in Teenagers with Cancer

Breast and prostate cancers are also among those most strongly associated with night-shift work, circadian disruption and alteration of biological rhythms.

The research suggests that long-term late night snacking may have the similar effect to night-shift work and circadian disruption.

“If the findings are confirmed, they will have implications for cancer prevention recommendations, which currently do not take meal timing into account,” Kogevinas noted. (IANS)