Wednesday March 20, 2019

Minimum Death Risk For Breast Cancer Patients From Heart Ailments

The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population

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Breast Cancer. Pixabay

Contrary to earlier findings, German researchers have concluded that there is no higher risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

In a largest cohort study evaluating data from almost 350,000 patients from the US cancer registries, the team found that the risk is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals, as well as control screenings at short intervals, seem to make up for elevated risks, said researchers from the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

Risk of death from heart ailments is less in women suffering from Breast Cancer.

“At first, we were also surprised by this result. But we assume that our study paints a more realistic picture of the actual situation of treatment than clinical trials,” said Janick Weberpals, the study’s initial author, in a paper published in the European Heart Journal.

Breast cancer is the second-most frequent cancer worldwide and the most common cancer in women. However, improved screening measures and more effective treatment methods have considerably lowered the risk of succumbing to the disease.

Also Read: Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

“However, a number of clinical trials have suggested that both chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with the risk of suffering heart disease as a consequence of treatment,” said Hermann Brenner from DKFZ.

Brenner’s team analysed cases of women who were diagnosed with breast cancer in the years 2000-2011 and subsequently received treatment by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The scientists found that the long-term risk of mortality from heart disease is not higher following breast cancer treatment than in the average female population.

Breast cancer awareness is very important in India.

“We consider the result of our study to be very positive for the treatment of breast cancer,” said Brenner. “It is particularly good news for the large number of affected patients that if they are in good medical care and have survived breast cancer, they do not need to be more worried about deadly heart diseases than women at the same age without breast cancer,” the researchers added. IANS

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Common Diabetes Drug May Offer Treatment For Breast Cancer, Says Study

However, neither of the drugs were originally designed to treat cancer

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay
Repurposing a common diabetes drug as well as another used for treating a group of inherited and acquired disorders may also help in the fight against resistant breast cancers that currently have no targeted therapy, finds a study.
The study, led by the University of Chicago, showed that the two existing drugs named metformin and haemin suppress tumour growth in mice, Xinhua reported.
“This is the first joint use of these two drugs. We think we have elucidated a new mechanism, something basic and fundamental, and found ways to use it,” said Marsha Rosner, Professor at the varsity.
The researchers found that the primary anti-cancer target for haemin is a transcription factor known as BACH1 (BTB and CNC homology1). This protein is often highly expressed in triple negative breast cancers and is required for metastasis.
BACH1 targets mitochondrial metabolism and can suppress a key source of cellular energy. When BACH1 is high, this energy source is shut down, the report said.
However, when cancer cells were treated with haemin, BACH1 was reduced, causing BACH1-depleted cancer cells to change metabolic pathways. This caused cancers that are vulnerable to metformin to suppress mitochondrial respiration.
Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay
“We found that this novel combination, haemin plus metformin, can suppress tumour growth, and we validated this in mouse tumour models,” explained Jiyoung Lee from the varsity.
The findings can extend beyond breast cancer.
BACH1 expression is enriched not only in triple negative breast cancers, but is also seen in many other cancers including lung, kidney, uterus, prostate and acute myeloid leukemia, the researchers noted.
However, neither of the drugs were originally designed to treat cancer.
Metformin, discovered in 1922 and used clinically since 1957, was developed to treat Type-2 diabetes. It decreases glucose production by the liver and increases insulin sensitivity.
Haemin, marketed as panhematin, was first crystallised from blood in 1853. It is now used to treat defects of haemin synthesis. These defects can cause porphyrias, a group of inherited and acquired disorders. (IANS)