Thursday October 18, 2018

Do you prefer drinking out of decorated glassware? Beware, you may be consuming large amounts of toxic lead, says new study

The presence of hazardous elements in both the paint and glaze of decorated glassware has obvious implications for both human health and the environment

0
//
37
lead
Love to decorate your glassware with paints? Beware, it could be making you unhealthy! Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

London, November 6, 2017 : Love to decorate your glassware with art? Beware, the paint used can contain potentially toxic levels of lead and cadmium, increasing health risks, a study has shown.

The findings showed that in enamelled drinking glasses, flakes of paint often come off, which could be ingested over a prolonged period and prove hazardous for human health.

For the study, researchers at the University of Plymouth carried out 197 tests on 72 new- and second-hand drinking glass products, including tumblers, beer and wine glasses, and jars.

They found lead present in 139 cases and cadmium in 134, both on the surface of the glasses and, in some cases, on the rims, with concentrations of lead sometimes more than 1,000 times higher than the safe limit.

ALSO READ Daily exposure to low-levels of Chemicals in everyday Objects cost Billions in Health Care and Disability in United States

“The presence of hazardous elements in both the paint and glaze of decorated glassware has obvious implications for both human health and the environment. So it was a real surprise to find such high levels of lead and cadmium, both on the outside of the glassware and around the rim,” said Andrew Turner, lead researcher from the varsity.

“There are genuine health risks posed through ingesting such levels of the substances over a prolonged period, so this is clearly an issue that the international glassware industry needs to take action on as a matter of urgency,” Turner added.

The study, published in the journal Science of the Total Environment, analysed a range of glassware using portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry.

The lead concentrations ranged from about 40 to 400,000 parts per million (ppm), while quantities of cadmium ranged from about 300 to 70,000 ppm.

According to the US Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, the limit levels for the externally decorated lip area of drinking glass are 200 ppm and 800 ppm, respectively.

“Given that safer alternatives are available to the industry, the overall results of this study are both surprising and concerning,” Turner said. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Exposure to Arsenic, Lead May Spike up Risk of Heart Disease

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, "population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts," the researchers concluded

0
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Even low levels of exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment like arsenic, lead, copper and cadmium pose a significant risk to cardiovascular health, finds a study, led by one of an Indian-origin.

Although often naturally occurring, these contaminants have made their way into water supplies and, via irrigation, into the food chain.

Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses.

However, the findings, published by The BMJ, showed there is increasing evidence to suggest that heavy metals may have other adverse effects on health – including cardiovascular disease such as heart disease and stroke – even at lower levels of exposure, the researchers said.

“It’s clear from our analysis that there’s a possible link between exposure to heavy metals or metalloids and risk of conditions such as heart disease, even at low doses – and the greater the exposure, the greater the risk,” said lead author Rajiv Chowdhury, from Britain’s University of Cambridge.

Heart Disease
Concern has often focused on the toxicity or carcinogenic properties of the metals, particularly at high doses. Pixabay

“While people shouldn’t be overly worried about any immediate health risk, it should send a message to policymakers that we need to take action to reduce people’s exposure.”

The study “reinforces the (often under-recognised) importance of environmental toxic metals in enhancing global cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioural risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet and inactivity,” the researchers said.

For the study, the team conducted a meta-analysis of 37 studies involving almost 350,000 participants.

Also Read- Honor Launches its Budget Smartphone Honor 7S in India

Chowdhury noted that the study highlighted the potential need for additional worldwide efforts and strategies “to reduce human exposures even in settings where there is a relatively lower average level of exposure.”

Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, “population-wide strategies to minimise exposure will further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts,” the researchers concluded. (IANS)