Monday November 18, 2019

Deficiency of Zinc May up Hypertension

Understanding the specific mechanisms by which zinc deficiency contributes to blood pressure dysregulation may have an important effect on the treatment of hypertension in chronic disease settings, the team noted

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'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study
'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study. Flickr

Lower-than-normal levels of zinc — a nutrient that helps the immune system fight off invading bacteria and viruses — may contribute to hypertension, finds a new study on mice.

The study, from the Wright State University in the US, demonstrated that the way in which the kidneys either excrete sodium into the urine or reabsorb it into the body — specifically through a pathway called the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) — also plays a role in controlling high blood pressure.

Zinc deficiency is common in people with illnesses such as Type-2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

It also showed that less sodium in the urine typically corresponds with higher blood pressure.

Zinc may help regulate proteins that in turn regulate the NCC, the study suggested.

For the study, researchers compared male mice with zinc deficiency to healthy controls with normal zinc levels.

Representational image. Pixabay

The results, published in the American Journal of Physiology — Renal Physiology, showed that zinc-deficient mice developed high blood pressure and a corresponding decrease in urinary sodium excretion.

However, the control group did not experience the same changes.

A small group of the zinc-deficient mice were fed a zinc-rich diet partway. Once the animals’ zinc reached adequate levels, blood pressure began to drop and urinary sodium levels increased.

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“These significant findings demonstrate that enhanced renal (sodium) re-absorption plays a critical role in (zinc-deficiency)-induced hypertension,” said Clintoria R. Williams, a researcher from the varsity.

Understanding the specific mechanisms by which zinc deficiency contributes to blood pressure dysregulation may have an important effect on the treatment of hypertension in chronic disease settings, the team noted. (IANS)

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Study: Air Pollution Linked to Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Diseases

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said

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air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of stroke, the researchers said. Pixabay

People who are exposed to high pollution levels are at significantly higher risk of suffering from hypertension, metabolic syndrome and heart diseases, says a new study.

In the study, published in Journal of Public Health, the researchers investigated the associations between a long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and residential distance to green spaces and major roads with the development of hypertension and metabolic syndrome components such as a high triglyceride level, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, higher blood glucose, and obesity.

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said. The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein.

air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein. VOA

Traffic-related exposure was associated with the incidence of hypertension, higher triglyceride level and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the negative impact of traffic air pollutants was observed only in the participants who lived in multifamily buildings.

ALSO READ: Paris to Restrict Car Use as a Measure to Fight Against Surging Air Pollution

The researchers also found positive effects of the natural environment, and have emphasized the positive impact of such spaces on cardiovascular health.

“Our research results enable us to say that we should regulate as much as possible the living space for one person in multifamily houses, improve the noise insulation of apartments, and promote the development of green spaces in multifamily houses” said study’s lead author Agn Brazien. (IANS)