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Delhi Golf Club’s bank account frozen for non-payment of tax

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The New Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) has frozen the bank account of the Delhi  Golf club for non-payment of property tax amount to Rs.769 crores approximately.

The club turned a deaf ear to the repeated reminders by NDMC to clear the outstanding tax payment after which the club’s account in RBL Bank was frozen.

An official member of NDMC claimed that at least six to seven legal notices were sent to the club to clear their dues which went unanswered. The most recent one was sent in November the previous year. As per the bylaws of the NDMC Act 1994, the council approached the club’s bank to recover Rs.269.24 crore but the bank soon sent a letter informing that their wasn’t enough balance in the account for payment.

A number of calls and messages to the office bearers of the Delhi Golf Club were also left unanswered. ” We sent them a final reminder last year before their bank account was attached. We informed the club the long pending dues, which have accumulated over several years. We gave them ample time to clear their dues but the administration was not ready to respond” said the NDMC official.

The Delhi Golf Club and NDMC have been involved in a long-standing legal battle over non-payment of taxation.(inputs from agencies)

  • Shriya Katoch

    Stringent measures need to be taken against tax offenders .

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U.S. Notifies World Trade Organization Against “Discriminatory” New Taxes on Digital Giants

The OECD is spearheading talks aimed at forging a new global agreement on taxing technology and digital giants who often declare their income in low-tax nations, depriving other countries of billions in revenue.

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WTO
World Trade Organization (WTO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, July 26, 2018. VOA

The U.S. is weighing a complaint at the World Trade Organization against “discriminatory” new taxes on digital giants such as a Facebook and Google which are being planned by France and other EU nations, a top US trade official said Tuesday.

“We think the whole theoretical basis of digital service taxes is ill-conceived and the effect is highly discriminatory against US-based multinationals,” Chip Harter, a Treasury official and US delegate for global tax talks, said in Paris.

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But that overhaul is expected until next year at the earliest, prompting France, Britain, Spain, Austria and Italy to move ahead with their own versions of a so-called “digital services tax” as soon as this year.
Pixabay

Speaking ahead of two days of talks at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Harter added that “various parts of our government are studying whether that discriminatory impact would give us rights under trade agreements and WTO treaties.”

The OECD is spearheading talks aimed at forging a new global agreement on taxing technology and digital giants who often declare their income in low-tax nations, depriving other countries of billions in revenue.

But that overhaul is expected until next year at the earliest, prompting France, Britain, Spain, Austria and Italy to move ahead with their own versions of a so-called “digital services tax” as soon as this year.

social media
The OECD is spearheading talks aimed at forging a new global agreement on taxing technology and digital giants who often declare their income in low-tax nations, depriving other countries of billions in revenue. Pixabay

Last week France unveiled draft legislation that would set a 3.0-percent levy on digital advertising, the sale of personal data and other revenue for tech groups with more than 750 million euros ($844 million) in worldwide revenue.

It would be applied retroactively from January 1, 2019, while the measures in the UK and other European countries might not come into effect until next year.

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“We do understand there’s political pressure around the world to tax various international businesses more heavily, and we actually agreed that that is appropriate,” Harter told journalists.

“But we think it should be done on a broader basis than just selecting a particular industry,” he said. (VOA)