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Delhi High Court Restrains Websites from Broadcasting World Cup Games: Report

The court has asked the Centre, websites and radio channels, Internet and telecom service providers to file their replies by September 4

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Delhi High Court. Source- Wikimedia

The Delhi High Court, in a latest interim order, has restrained over 60 websites, around 14 radio channels and nearly 30 Internet and telecom service providers from broadcasting the 2019 cricket World Cup matches.

Justice J.R. Midha’s interim order came while hearing a Channel 2 Group Corporation plea seeking a stay on audio broadcasts or streaming or transmitting of World Cup matches on over 100 platforms, including websites, private radio platform operators, Internet service providers and telecom service providers.

Channel 2 Group Corporation’s advocate Jayant Mehta and Subhalaxmi Sen told the court that these platforms are not authorised or licensed by the Channel 2 Group and they cannot make any audio or radio broadcasts, live streaming or report any live or deferred update pertaining to any International Cricket Council (ICC) event, including any of the matches of the World Cup 2019.

The advocates said that the Channel 2 Group holds copyright and exclusive rights over such audio or radio broadcasts.

Channel 2 Group Corporation has entered into an Audio Rights Agreement with ICC Business Corporation FZ LLC, which is the organiser of ICC Men’s World Cup 2019.

“Any unauthorised audio or radio broadcasts, live or deferred update, by those defendants would be illegal and amount to piracy since the plaintiff (Channel 2 Group) holds copyright and exclusive rights over such audio or radio broadcasts,” the advocate told the court.

If these broadcasts are not restrained, the Group would suffer an irreparable injury and would be left without any remedy since the event has already begun and is to continue until July 14, the counsel added.

Photo credit: www.dailymail.co.uk

The court was satisfied with the counsel’s submission and said that “ex-parte interim order is warranted in the facts of the present case.”

“…the Defendants (websites and other), their partners, proprietors, their officers, servants, agents and representatives, franchisees and all others in capacity of principal or agent, acting for and on their behalf are restrained from broadcasting/communicating to the public audio/ radio streaming or reporting live or deferred updates including by virtue of reporting of such event highlights in World Cup, 2019 through any means without authorisation of the plaintiff,” the court said.

It restrained transmitting or making available any match of the World Cup 2019, including live or deferred score updates through any website, application or any other digital platform through Internet, mobile and radio delivery, till the next date of hearing on September 4.

“However, any defendant complying with the interim order of this Court may relay the score update by any party, doing so gratuitously only after a time lag of 15 minutes,” the court said.

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The court has asked the Centre, websites and radio channels, Internet and telecom service providers to file their replies by September 4.

The court also directed that the search engines take down or delete from their search results pages, listings of websites or URLs which are infringing the petitioner’s copyright and broadcast reproduction rights. (IANS)

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VandaTheGod: Researchers Identify Super Hacker With 4,820 Records of Hacked Websites

VandaTheGod is said to hack governments, corporations and individuals

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A super hacker with the name of VandaTheGod was identified by researchers. Pixabay

A super hacker by the name of VandaTheGod who hacked governments, corporations and individuals alike since 2013 has been linked with high certainty to a specific Brazilian individual from the city of Uberlandia.

Researchers at Isreali cybersecurity firm Check Point said they have relayed the findings to law enforcement agencies to enable them to take further action, adding that adding the social media activities on profiles associated with VandaTheGod came to a halt towards the end of 2019.

Since 2013, many official websites belonging to governments worldwide were hacked and defaced by an attacker who self-identified as ‘VandaTheGod.’

The hacker targeted governments in numerous countries, including: Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, Argentina, Thailand, Vietnam, and New Zealand.

“Many of the messages left on the defaced websites implied that the attacks were motivated by anti-government sentiment, and were carried out to combat social injustices that the hacker believed were a direct result of government corruption,” Check Point said on Thursday.

VandaTheGod didn’t just go after government websites, but also launched attacks against public figures, universities, and even hospitals.

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Super hacker VandaTheGod had a personal goal to hack 5,000 websites. Pixabay

In one case, the attacker claimed to have access to the medical records of 1 million patients from New Zealand, which were offered for sale for just $200.

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“Most of VandaTheGod’s attacks against governments were politically motivated, but a closer look at some of tweets shows the attacker also trying to achieve a personal goal: hacking a total of 5,000 websites,” said researchers.

The goal was nearly reached, as there are currently 4,820 records of hacked websites linked to VandaTheGod.

“VandaTheGod has proven with numerous successful attacks against reputable websites, that hacktivism often crosses a line into further criminal activity, such as credentials and payment-card theft,” said Check Point. (IANS)

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82% People Try To Remove Private information From Websites, Social Media (Tech Report)

For instance, the report revealed that 24 per cent of consumers claim that their personal data or information about their family has become publicly available without their consent

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Understanding how to safely keep personal details on the internet and efficiently manage where your data is stored is a step towards ensuring a positive online presence, improving your personal reputation and opening up future opportunities. Pixabay

The Internet consumers are becoming more aware of their personal data and 82 per cent users have tried to remove private information from websites or social media channels, a new report said on Saturday.

However, a third (37 per cent) of those surveyed said they still have no idea how to go about it, according to cybersecurity firm Kaspersky. Consumers have shown that it is not just their private information that they are worried about, but their loved ones’ too.

For instance, the report revealed that 24 per cent of consumers claim that their personal data or information about their family has become publicly available without their consent.

“Understanding how to safely keep personal details on the internet and efficiently manage where your data is stored is a step towards ensuring a positive online presence, improving your personal reputation and opening up future opportunities,” Marina Titova, Head of Consumer Product Marketing at Kaspersky said in a statement.

A significant proportion of people apply additional measures when browsing the internet, to hide their information from cybercriminals (43 per cent), the websites they visit (41 per cent), and other individuals accessing the same device (37 per cent).

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The Internet consumers are becoming more aware of their personal data and 82 per cent users have tried to remove private information from websites or social media channels, a new report said. Pixabay

Additionally, some consumers remain wary about storing personal information on their devices. For instance, a fifth (21 per cent) also say they are concerned about personal data collected. To make sure users personal information remains protected on the internet, Kaspersky advises consumers to keep a list of their online accounts so they have a full understanding of which services and websites may be storing personal information.

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Meanwhile, one can start using “Privacy Checker” that helps consider setting their social media profiles to private. It will make it harder for third parties to find highly personal information. The report included findings from a new consumer survey carried out in 23 countries. (IANS)

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Reach Of “Fake News” During Elections May Not Be as Extensive as Feared, Says Research

The research, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, showed that untrustworthy websites accounted for only six per cent of all Americans' news diets on average during the period before and immediately after the U.S. presidential election

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Online misinformation is a serious problem, but one that we can only address appropriately if we know the magnitude of the problem. Pixabay

The reach of the so called “fake news” websites during elections may not be as widespread as commonly feared as researchers have found that visits to untrustworthy websites only account for a small portion of a voter’s news diet.

The research, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, showed that untrustworthy websites accounted for only six per cent of all Americans’ news diets on average during the period before and immediately after the U.S. presidential election.

Less than half of all Americans visited an untrustworthy website during the period, said the study. The Rea”These findings show why we need to measure exposure to ‘fake news’ rather than just assuming it is ubiquitous online,” said Brendan Nyhan, Professor at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, US.

“Online misinformation is a serious problem, but one that we can only address appropriately if we know the magnitude of the problem,” Nyhan said.

To assess the audience for “fake news,” the researchers measured visits to these dubious websites during the period before and immediately after the election using an online survey of 2,525 Americans and web traffic data collected by YouGov Pulse between October 7-November 16, 2016 from respondents’ laptops or desktop computers.

The U.S. presidential election that year was held on November 8. Republican Donald Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in the election.

The results of the study showed that visits to dubious news sites differed sharply along ideological and partisan lines. Content from untrustworthy conservative sites accounted for nearly five per cent of people’s news diets compared to less than one per cent for untrustworthy liberal sites.

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The reach of the so called “fake news” websites during elections may not be as widespread as commonly feared as researchers have found that visits to untrustworthy websites only account for a small portion of a voter’s news diet. Pixabay

Respondents who identified themselves as Trump supporters were also more likely to visit an untrustworthy site (57 per cent) than those who indicated that they were Clinton supporters (28 per cent). The data also revealed that Facebook was the most prominent gateway to untrustworthy websites.

Respondents were more likely to have visited Facebook than Google, Twitter or a webmail platform such as Gmail in the period immediately before visiting an untrustworthy website. Finally, the study demonstrates that fact-checking websites appeared to be relatively ineffective in reaching the audiences of untrustworthy websites.

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Only 44 per cent of respondents who visited such a website also visited a fact-checking site during the study, and almost none of them had read a fact-check debunking specific claims made in a potentially questionable article. (IANS)