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‘Delhi Metro Cruelly Killed my ‘Achhe Din” : Here is why Passengers are dumping the popular mode of travel

The author shares her take on shifting to Delhi from Kolkata and her experience with the Delhi Metro

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– By Somrita Ghosh

New Delhi, November 5, 2017 : Delhi Metro cruelly killed my “acche din”.

Metro fares have been doubled in just four months, forcing me to give up my favorite mode of transport and take to crowded DTC buses.

Besides putting the new fares beyond my budget, I have also been stripped off the safety of travelling in the Metro. And I am not the only one.

My biggest shock came two days after the latest Metro fare hike. I commute daily between Green Park in south Delhi and Noida Sector 16 where I work.

As I punched my smart card while leaving the Sector 16 station, my heart skipped a beat — Rs 37 had been deducted from my card.

By the time I reached my office, the mental calculation was already done. I realized every month I would have to spend double of what I was shelling out only five months ago if I wanted to use the Delhi Metro.

When the year began, I was spending Rs 18 on my Metro ride — one way. The Metro then hiked the fares and my one-way cost shot up to Rs 27. The latest hike had taken it to Rs 37!

This was hard for me to digest. The sudden hike of almost Rs 20, that too one way, was surely going to painfully pinch my wallet.

When I landed in Delhi five years ago, my friends advised me to avail the Metro, not just because it is safe for women but comfortable too, never mind the crushing rush during peak hours.

Most important, as I realized very soon, the Metro was affordable. It was so cheap that while an auto-rickshaw would charge me a minimum of Rs 25 from my home to the nearest Metro station, the Metro charged me only Rs 18 all the way from south Delhi to Noida in Uttar Pradesh. This was too good to be true.

Since I came from Kolkata, where the minimum Metro fare was only Rs 4 and the maximum Rs 12, Delhi Metro initially seemed costly.

But I realized the full story in no time once I started using the Delhi Metro. The infrastructure, service and overall facilities provided by Delhi Metro were far better compared to Kolkata.

Delhi Metro offers free WiFi, its stations have coffee shops and the bigger ones even host fast food chains. Travel is hassle-free despite the odd technical snags that hit the Blue Line that I use.

But suddenly charging a salaried person like me Rs 40 more, or Rs 1,200 a month, just because the Metro needs to finance itself better is something I cannot appreciate.

Like numerous others, I have changed my mode of transport. It is now the DTC buses. The DTC’s frequency may not match the Metro’s and DTC rides can be bumpy too, not to talk of unending traffic jams. But do I have a choice?

(Editorial note : This article has been written by Somrita Ghosh of IANS. She can be contacted at somrita.g@ians.in)

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Pakistan Tests its 1st Metro Train in Lahore Under CPEC

Pakistan on Wednesday made a test run of its first metro train service in Lahore, the capital of the country's eastern Punjab province, from Dera Gujran to Lakshmi Chowk on a 12-km portion of the total 27.1-km route.

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Following this, a National Security Committee was also held to discuss Sharif's
Pakistan Flag, wikimedia commons

Pakistan on Wednesday made a test run of its first metro train service in Lahore, the capital of the country’s eastern Punjab province, from Dera Gujran to Lakshmi Chowk on a 12-km portion of the total 27.1-km route.

According to a statement from the Punjab government, Shahbaz Sharif, Chief Minister of Punjab, inaugurated the test run of the Orange Line Metro Train (OLMT), which has been tested once earlier.

“The OLMT is Pakistan’s first mass rapid transit train project launched by the Punjab government. It will prove to be a real game changer for the people of Lahore and Punjab, who will experience a comfortable, secure and economical travelling facility,” said the statement.

Pakistan on Wednesday made a test run of its first metro train service in Lahore.
representational image. pixabay

The test run was free of cost for travellers. The chief minister also took a tour of the train along with Chinese consular general in Lahore and senior officials of the Punjab government.

“The OLMT project will transform people’s lives. The project will become the basis of an interaction between different classes of society by creating a sense of equality and ownership in social terms,” said the chief minister.

A total of 27 sets of trains, each comprising five cars, will be used for the service in the project, a part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

Also Read: Pakistan’s First Transgender News Anchor

An energy-saving air-conditioning system suitable for the constant high summer temperature and unstable voltage in Lahore is the main trait of the train, said the officials, adding that the train has heat-resistant bogies, which will increase its durability.

The OLMT is the first of the three rail lines of the proposed Lahore Metro project that is expected to transport half a million people daily. The OLMT, with an operating speed of 80 km per hour, is expected to be used by up to 250,000 passengers a day at 26 stations. (IANS)

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