Saturday March 24, 2018
Home India Delhi touches...

Delhi touches new record with 10,683 dengue cases reported till October 10


NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: Health authorities said on Monday that with 10,683 dengue cases reported till October 10, Delhi recorded the highest number of patients of the viral disease in 19 years.

The last time dengue cases crossed the 10,000 mark was in 1996, when the city reported 10,252 patients, the authorities added.

The number of dengue cases reported from Delhi’s adjacent areas, suburban Ghaziabad in Uttar Pradesh, and Gurgaon and Faridabad in Haryana, stood at 646.

According to the figures released by the Municipal Corporation of Delhi, as many as 3,077 new cases were detected in the last one week.

Areas under the South Delhi Municipal Corporation witnessed the highest 2,432 cases while in the East Delhi Municipal Corporation areas witnessed the lowest  with 1,413 cases. The North Delhi Municipal Corporation recorded 2,307 cases in the last one week.

According to civic authorities, the official toll due to dengue in the national capital was 30, though the unofficial figure rose up to over 85.

Among the latest dengue victims confirmed by hospital authorities were a teenager and a 41-year-old man, who succumbed to the vector-borne disease on Sunday.

“The number of fever cases arriving at our hospital is more. The subject needs to be closely observed. In the middle of August, the number of cases went down but it is again rising,” AK Gadhpahilay, medical superintendent of Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, told reporters.

“As winter arrives, dengue cases will see a decline,” he hoped.

A senior emergency medicine expert at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences said, “Dengue seems uncontrollable now. The number of cases witnessed this year clearly indicates that municipal authorities can’t just depend on fumigation and light initiatives to prevent dengue. This has become a regular problem in every monsoon season.”

(With inputs from IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Dengue fever may increase risk of stroke: Study

For the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, the researchers looked at data on 13,787 patients

Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay
  • Dengue fever can increase the risk of stroke
  • Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease
  • The research was started in around 2012

People with dengue fever may have a higher risk of stroke, especially in the first two months following infection, a new study has claimed.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection that infects at least 100 million people every year around the world, with about 4 billion people at risk of the illness, which includes dengue hemorrhagic fever that can lead to spontaneous bleeding, organ failure and death.

“Clinicians in dengue-endemic areas should be aware of this association, especially for patients with dengue who have neurologic deficits or for patients with stroke who have unexplained fever,” said co-author Chia-Hung Kao from the China Medical University Hospital in Taiwan.

Stroke is a severe neurologic complication of dengue fever, described in only a few case reports. The incidence and risk factors for stroke in patients with dengue remain unclear, the researchers said.

We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the risk of stroke in patients with dengue, the researchers added.

People suffering dengue fever have higher risk of suffering from strokes.
People suffering dengue fever have higher risk of suffering from strokes.

For the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, the researchers looked at data on 13,787 patients (most between 31 and 60 years of age) with newly diagnosed dengue between 2000 and 2012. They found the incidence of stroke was higher in people with dengue fever.

The risk of stroke was as high as 2.49 times in the first two months of infection with dengue relative to control patients who did not have dengue,” the researchers said.

Also Read: Decoded: Why Mosquitoes Bite You

“Our findings may help with clinical risk evaluation and may serve as a basis for further investigation of the pathogenesis of dengue-related stroke,” they noted. IANS

Next Story