Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Tweeters unable to automatically save tweets to facebook. Pixabay

In what is seen as an attempt to offer the public a clearer picture of how Facebook was manipulated during the 2016 US presidential election, Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee are reportedly planning to release thousands of Russia-linked ads on the social network.

According to a report in The Wall Street Journal, the Democrats might release more than 3,000 such ads.


“We have been in ongoing discussions with Facebook and hope to have the final redacted ads in our possession within a matter of days. As soon as we receive them, it is our intention to share them with the public,” The Hill quoted California Democratic Representative Adam Schiff as saying on Sunday.


Donald Trump . VOA

The ads could be released early this week depending on whether the panel’s Democrats can reach an agreement with Facebook over how much to redact, according to the Journal.

Facebook said the ads were purchased by Russia-linked Internet Research Agency.

While the Republican-majority committee released their final report last month detailing Russian election meddling, Democrats on the committee said the probe had not yet concluded.

The report found no evidence of collusion between President Donald Trump and Russian authorities.

Also Read: Haspel, Trump’s Choice For CIA Director, Withdraws Her Name

Facebook came under the scanner after it was revealed that Russia-linked ads tried to influence the 2016 election.

The social network earlier admitted it had identified 470 accounts connected to the Internet Research Agency.

Facebook is also facing scrutiny for the misuse of its data by Cambridge Analytica.

The social networking giant admitted that the data of up to 87 million users was passed on illegally to the British research firm. (IANS)


Popular

Unsplash

Meta-owned WhatsApp on Monday announced an incubator programme in India.

Meta-owned WhatsApp on Monday announced an incubator programme in India that will select 10 organisations and help them build digital solutions to tackle critical health issues.

Called the WhatsApp Incubator Programme (WIP), the initiative aims to facilitate positive and measurable health outcomes at scale by leveraging the WhatsApp Business Platform.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

India has to define its stand and negotiate its international policy keeping in view the nation's best interests of the long run.

By D.C. Pathak

Advent of Biden Presidency with its resonating calls of 'America is back', 'we will repair our alliances' and 'will engage with the world once again' on one hand and the rise of President Xi Jinping with a stronger hold on China after the Plenary session of the 19th Central Committee of CPC, on the other, have got strategic analysts to examine if a new Cold War was already on the horizon.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Digital becomes more popular and companies expand their D2C (direct-to-consumer) connections

Smartphone companies which have strong consumer pull now face most of the reputation issues caused by infringement of their brands in the digital space, according to a new report.

There are three main techniques pertaining to brand infringement —fake gratification, fake presence and fake representation.

According to Faisal Kawoosa, founder and chief analyst, Techarc, as digital becomes mainstream and brands increase their D2C (direct-to-consumer) engagements, they need to proactively police the digital space to hunt for any infringement cases.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

"The first thing brands need to do is to come out of denial mode and create a common synergy between marketing, ecommerce, IT and digital teams," he said in the Brand Reputation Index (BRIX) report.

In fake gratification, scammers infringe any brand's identity by offering fake coupons, rewards, schemes, and discounts. This is the easiest trap for consumers who are searching for best deals when they decide about buying a smartphone of their interest.

Keep reading... Show less