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Demolish concrete illegal structures on Yamuna flood plains in Agra: NGT

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YAMUNA RIVER

By NewsGram Staff Writer

The National Green Tribunal (NGT) today issued a notice for the demolition of concrete illegal structures on the Yamuna flood plains in the Agra region.

The notice, which is returnable till May 26, was a result of public suit filed by D.K. Joshi, an environmentalist and a member of the Supreme Court monitoring committee on environmental issues in the Taj Trapezium Zone.

The notice was issued to the divisional commissioner of Agra, the vice chairman of the Agra Development Authority (ADA), the Municipal Commissioner of Agra and the head of the UP Jal Nigam, inquiring that why builders were permitted to raise multi-storied structures on the Yamuna flood plains in blatant violation of high court orders restricting construction activity within 500 metres of the river.

Joshi said, “ADA had identified 59 buildings on the flood plains in 2013 but no action was taken to demolish them.”

Joshi has asked for immediate orders to clear the flood plains to ensure the safety of life and to save the river.

Joshi in his 200-page suit, complete with photographs, annexure and court orders has also raised the issue of garbage being dumped on the river bed and the river banks. Civic laws restrict the dumping of hazardous substances in the river.

“The flood plains had been usurped by squatters in Mau, Jaganpur, Khaspur, Dayal Bagh, Sikandrapur, Poiya Ghat, Ghatwasan and Naraich and that no Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) had been conducted yet,” he added.

NGT has also been asked to give clear-cut orders for demolishing all illegal structures on the flood plains and issue guidelines for future construction activity along the riverfront.

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study
Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study. (IANS)

Men who grew up in challenging conditions like prevalence of infectious diseases or poor nutrition may have lower levels of testosterone — male sex hormone — in later life, says a study.

The findings suggest that the differences may be linked to energy investment. For instance, in environments where people are more exposed to disease or poor nutrition, developing males direct their energy towards survival at the cost of testosterone.

While high testosterone levels may up the risk of ageing, muscle mass, prostate enlargement and cancer, lower levels may cause lack of energy, erectile dysfunction etc. Thus, the researchers suggest that any screening for risk profiles may need to take a man’s childhood environment into account.

“Very high and very low testosterone levels can have implications for men’s health and it could be important to know more about men’s childhood circumstances to build a fuller picture of their risk factors for certain conditions or diseases,” said Gillian Bentley from Britain’s Durham University.

testosterone
Representational image.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the team collected data from 359 men born and still resident in Bangladesh; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as children; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as adults; second-generation, Britain born men whose parents were Bangladeshi migrants; and Britain born ethnic Europeans.

The results showed that Bangladeshi men who grew up and lived as adults in Britain had significantly higher levels of testosterone compared to relatively well-off men who grew up and lived in Bangladesh as adults.

Also Read: Attractiveness in Males is Not Associated With Female’s Hormone Levels, says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood.

Further, it was also found that the aspects of male reproductive function remain changeable up to the age of 19 and are more flexible in early rather than late childhood, but no longer heavily influenced by their surroundings. (IANS)