Monday March 18, 2019

Dengue fever may increase risk of stroke: Study

For the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, the researchers looked at data on 13,787 patients

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Aedes
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay
  • Dengue fever can increase the risk of stroke
  • Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease
  • The research was started in around 2012

People with dengue fever may have a higher risk of stroke, especially in the first two months following infection, a new study has claimed.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection that infects at least 100 million people every year around the world, with about 4 billion people at risk of the illness, which includes dengue hemorrhagic fever that can lead to spontaneous bleeding, organ failure and death.

“Clinicians in dengue-endemic areas should be aware of this association, especially for patients with dengue who have neurologic deficits or for patients with stroke who have unexplained fever,” said co-author Chia-Hung Kao from the China Medical University Hospital in Taiwan.

Stroke is a severe neurologic complication of dengue fever, described in only a few case reports. The incidence and risk factors for stroke in patients with dengue remain unclear, the researchers said.

We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study to investigate the risk of stroke in patients with dengue, the researchers added.

People suffering dengue fever have higher risk of suffering from strokes.
People suffering dengue fever have higher risk of suffering from strokes.

For the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, the researchers looked at data on 13,787 patients (most between 31 and 60 years of age) with newly diagnosed dengue between 2000 and 2012. They found the incidence of stroke was higher in people with dengue fever.

The risk of stroke was as high as 2.49 times in the first two months of infection with dengue relative to control patients who did not have dengue,” the researchers said.

Also Read: Decoded: Why Mosquitoes Bite You

“Our findings may help with clinical risk evaluation and may serve as a basis for further investigation of the pathogenesis of dengue-related stroke,” they noted. IANS

Next Story

Obese People Have Increased Chances of Surviving a Stroke

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5

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Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. VOA

While obesity has known to be a key risk factor in many diseases, a new study suggests having some extra body fat may be linked to an increased chance of surviving a stroke.

“It was noticed that carrying extra weight may play a role in survival for people who had suffered from kidney and heart disease, We felt the need to investigate whether it also was tied to improved stroke survival,” said Zuolu Liu, researcher at the University of California-Los Angeles.

The study, presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st annual meeting in the US, found that severely obese people were 62 per cent less likely to die than people of normal weight.

Obese people were 46 per cent less likely to die after a stroke and those who were overweight had 15 per cent more chances of survival.

Representational image.
Overweight people have better chances of survival from stroke: Study. Pixabay

Conversely, underweight people were 67 per cent more likely to die after a stroke than people of normal weight.

The condition called the obesity paradox suggests being overweight may be protective for some, such as old people or those with certain chronic diseases.

Also Read- Researchers Discover Enzyme Inhibitor To Treat Deadly Brain Tumours in Kids

“One possible explanation is people who are overweight or obese may have a nutritional reserve that may help them survive during prolonged illness. More research is needed to investigate the relationship between body mass index and stroke,” Liu stated.

For the study, the team looked at 1,033 stroke-affected people with an average age of 71 and an average body mass index (BMI) of 27.5. (IANS)