Tuesday June 18, 2019

Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss

The researchers found that depression, anxiety and a combined category of depression or anxiety were significantly different in tooth loss than in the participants without such conditions

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Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study
Anxiety linked to kicking, yelling during sleep: Study. Pixabay

Dental decay and tooth loss may not be simple medical problems and psychological issues such as depression and anxiety are linked to these conditions, research suggests.

“Tooth loss from caries (dental decay) and periodontal disease (when the gums detach from the teeth) is an outcome from complex, chronic conditions,” said the research.

“Several bio-psychosocial factors are involved, including accessing care. Individuals reporting dental anxiety may avoid dental care and individuals with depression may be negligent in self-care,” said R. Constance Wiener from West Virginia University.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, researchers used a data of 451,075 respondents and selected those who were 19 years or older, and had complete data on depression, anxiety and tooth loss.

Also Read: Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth

There were 76,292 eligible participants; and 13.4 percent of participants reported anxiety, 16.7 percent reported depression, and 5.7 percent reported total tooth loss.

The researchers found that depression, anxiety and a combined category of depression or anxiety were significantly different in tooth loss than in the participants without such conditions. (Bollywood Country)

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Study: Lack of Sleep Associated with Wide Range of Mental Health Issues in Students, Athletes

Published in the journal Sleep, the study analysis involved 110,496 students, out of which 8,462 were athletes

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Sleep, Mental Health, Students
Insufficient sleep is associated with a wide range of mental health issues. Pixabay

Insufficient sleep is associated with a wide range of mental health issues such as anxiety, self-harm and suicide ideation among students and athletes, according to a study. Published in the journal Sleep, the study analysis involved 110,496 students, out of which 8,462 were athletes.

“It was really surprising to see how strongly insufficient sleep was associated with a wide variety of mental health symptoms among college students,” said lead author Thea Ramsey from the University of Arizona in the US.

With every additional night of insufficient sleep, the risk of experiencing mental health symptoms increased on average by more than 20 per cent.

insufficient sleep, mental health issues
Published in the journal Sleep, the study analysis involved 110,496 students, out of which 8,462 were athletes. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Good Sleep Helps in Reducing Desire for Sweet, Salty Foods

The risk also increased by 21 per cent for depressed mood, 24 per cent for hopelessness, 24 per cent for anger, 25 per cent for anxiety, 25 per cent for desire to self-harm, 28 per cent for functional problems and 28 per cent for suicide ideation.

“The fact that sleep health was so strongly related to mental health is important since the majority of college students don’t get the recommended amount of sleep needed for optimal health and functioning,” said Michael Grander from the varsity. (IANS)