Friday November 15, 2019

Depression in Males Can Reduce The Pregnancy Chances, says Study

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

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Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
Depression in males can reduce the chances of pregnancy. Pixabay

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.

The study showed that couples in which the male partner had major depression were 60 per cent less likely to conceive and give birth than those in which the male partner did not have major depression.

On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth.

In addition, intake of a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) was also linked to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility, the study appearing in the journal Fertility and Sterility, noted.

However, SSRIs, another class of antidepressants, were not linked to pregnancy loss. Neither depression in the female partner nor the use of any other class of antidepressant were linked to lower pregnancy rates.

 

“Our study provides infertility patients and their physicians with new information to consider when making treatment decisions,” said Esther Eisenberg, at National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Maryland, US.

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth. Pixabay

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

Another study of men seeking in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatments reported that nearly 50 per cent experienced depression.

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For the study, the team analysed data for 1,650 women and 1,608 men to evaluate the potential influence of depression in couples seeking non-IVF treatments.

Among the women, 5.96 per cent were rated as having active major depression, compared to 2.28 per cent of the men.

Women using non-SSRIs were roughly 3.5 times as likely to have a first-trimester pregnancy loss, compared to those not using antidepressants. (IANS)

Next Story

If Correctly Practiced, Yoga Can Help to Recover Mental Health Issues

Although studies with more participants would be helpful in further investigating its benefits, this small study indicates adding yoga to the prescription may be helpful

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Research has shown combining therapy and medication along with Yoga has greater success than either treatment alone. Pixabay

 

 If applied in right “doses”, Yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in both short and long terms, reveal new research.

Published in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, the study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provided evidence that yoga can be a helpful complementary treatment for clinical depression or major depressive disorder.

To reach this conclusion, a group of 30 clinically depressed patients were randomly divided into two groups.

Both groups engaged in lyengar yoga (founded by B.K.S. Iyengar) and coherent breathing with the only difference being the number of instructional and home sessions in which each group participated.

Over three months, the high-dose group spent 123 hours in sessions while the low-dose group spent 87 hours.

Results showed that within a month, both groups’ sleep quality significantly improved.

Tranquility, positivity, physical exhaustion and symptoms of anxiety and depression significantly improved in both groups, as measured by several validated clinical scales

“Think of it this way, we give medications in different doses in order to enact their effects on the body to varying degrees. Here, we explored the same concept, but used yoga. We call that a dosing study,” explained Chris Streeter, associate professor of psychiatry at BUSM.

Past yoga and depression studies have not really delved deeply into this.

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If applied in right “doses”, Yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in both short and long terms, reveal new research. Pixabay

“The data is crucial for accompanying investigations of underlying neurobiology that will help elucidate ‘how’ yoga works,” added study co-author Marisa M. Silveri, neuroscientist at McLean Hospital and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Research has shown combining therapy and medication has greater success than either treatment alone.

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Although studies with more participants would be helpful in further investigating its benefits, this small study indicates adding yoga to the prescription may be helpful. (IANS)