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Desalination of water: How Middle East revolutionized this technology?

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By Swati Misra

The Middle East nations started practicing the process of desalination in a fight against water scarcity ages ago, and today, they have become the pioneer in this technology. Most of the oil rich countries like Yemen, Israel, Qatar, Saudi Arabia access sanitary water due to the process of desalination. Recently, Dubai launched UAE’s largest desalination plant in Jebel Ali. So, what exactly is this technology and why has it gained this prominence?

In a desalination plant, the process of desalination can be done in three possible ways, namely, thermal, electrical and pressure-based. These methods are usually based on certain factors like cost, available resources, energy consumption and on the type of water they can be applied on, i.e., sea water or brackish water. Middle East nations consist of the largest number of thermal plants. The process of separating pure water from salt water by distillation is used in the thermal process while using membranes to separate them is followed in the process of RO technology, i.e., Reverse Osmosis. The Thermal process involves two major technologies. They are Multi Stage Flash Distillation (MSF) and Multiple Effect Distillation (MED).

In case of a plant using MSF technology, the sea water is first heated and pressurized and then it is introduced in different cells maintained in low pressure and temperature where the feed water converts into steam. The steam is then condensed into pure water. The final product of the heated water is then reheated multiple times while the pressure keeps on reducing in every new cell. The major disadvantage in this process is that it requires more intake of salt water.

www.sidem-desalination.com
www.sidem-desalination.com

In case of Multiple Effect Distillation, the entire process remains similar to MSF desalination, however, here, the plants do not require a large flow of sea water or brine, thereby, reducing the consumption of electricity.

This process of desalination has been badly criticized for over-using energy resources with a heavy carbon footprint. One of the major disadvantages of this process is its impact on the environment, specifically on the ocean ecosystem. In this process, a huge amount of salt is discharged into the ocean which holds a huge risk of completely destroying the underwater ecosystem.

However, with technological advancements, the process of desalination has become cheaper, cleaner and more energy efficient. In fact the environmentalists of the region believe that the process of desalination have emerged as a substitute to the alternative ways of water management that have become the victims of industrial pollution.

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  • Swati misra

    AGAIN …This article was written by me…. Extremely shameful case of PLAGIARISM!!! USELESS ORGANISATION … Kindly have some decency and do not steal somebody else’s Intellectual Property…

  • Swati misra

    AGAIN …This article was written by me…. Extremely shameful case of PLAGIARISM!!! USELESS ORGANISATION … Kindly have some decency and do not steal somebody else’s Intellectual Property…

Next Story

Microsoft takes ‘Project Sangam’ to Middle East and Africa

"Project Sangam" was commenced from Andhra Pradesh

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Microsoft's 99DOTS initiative helping TB patients in India
Microsoft expands 'Project Sangam'. Wikimedia commons

In a bid to bridge the widening skill gap, Microsoft on Monday announced expansion of the capabilities of its Cloud-powered “Project Sangam” to the Middle East and Africa.

Launched in India by Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella last year, “Project Sangam” is a Cloud-hosted platform that leverages Azure services and professional networking platform LinkedIn to support new entrants to the job market, enabling key stakeholders across the skilling ecosystem find the right talent.

Microsoft to pay $250,000 to help them catch chip bugs. Wikimedia Commons
Microsoft’s Sangam is a cloud-based platform. Wikimedia Commons

“Lack of skilled resources is one of the key issues that governments across the world are facing. There is an enormous scope for technology to come in to address the skill gap that exists in the workforce today,” Anil Bhansali, Corporate Vice President, Cloud & Enterprise, said in a statement.

Nadella launched “Project Sangam” to help the Indian government not only train but also assist people get jobs via LinkedIn that was acquired by the company for $26.2 billion in an all-cash deal in 2016. “Project Sangam” was commenced from Andhra Pradesh.

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“‘Sangam’ is the first project that wields the combined strength of LinkedIn and Microsoft to tackle the challenge of how to provide every person the opportunity to skill themselves,” added Bhansali who is also Managing Director of Microsoft India (R&D) Private Limited. As part of the expansion, Microsoft South Africa and the Gauteng Provincial Government (GPG) have launched “Thint’iMillion”, an online mass learning system.

Microsoft Kaizala
The project was first launched in Andhra Pradesh. VOA

Part of the “Tshepo 1Million Digital Mass” learning programme, the “Thint’iMillion” programme will be deployed on “Project Sangam”, allowing young people to access content via an on-phone app (Android only), tablet mode (Windows and Android) as well as an interactive web portal. IANS