Home Lead Story Ways to Devel...

Ways to Develop Leadership in Children

Making future leaders out of today's children

0
leadership
It's important to nurture leadership in the upcoming generation and make our children great leaders. Pixabay

India has one of largest youth populations in the world, and it’s important to nurture leadership in the upcoming generation and make our children great leaders.

“As we embark on this journey, let’s ask ourselves, ‘Who is a leader?’ A true leader is one who understands that we are all pieces of a puzzle that complete a picture, and we all need to do the right thing, the right way,” Ashu Khanna, Founder & CEO, Arka Leadership told IANSlife.

These are some habits you can inculcate in young ones today, to create leaders for tomorrow:

Develop self awareness

We all possess infinite attributes that help us live through life successfully. We can help children discover their uniqueness by exposing them to different subjects. Teachers are the observers who can aid in recognising this uniqueness through different techniques of play. When we nurture uniqueness and celebrate milestones rather than just grades, we contribute to developing the self-esteem of a child. A foundation of self-esteem helps us live successfully, where money and titles become a by-product, not the destination.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news

Celebrate the courage to be authentic

leadership
Self leadership requires time, space, nourishment and patience and above all, courage to live with authenticity. Pixabay

Freedom of self-expression is our birth right. The expectation to fit in in creates stress. Let’s pause and assess, does the current education system develop emotionally resilient and innovative human beings or students who have learned to follow a system? We need leaders, not just followers. Self leadership requires time, space, nourishment and patience and above all, courage to live with authenticity. This can start with simple steps like making them take responsibility for their choices and presenting consequences for their actions. The courage to make choices and face consequences comes from faith in self.

Also Read- Skincare Routine for Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle

Nurture conscious leaders

We can develop faith in self when we have knowledge on the truth of life. True knowledge, as per the Bhagavad Gita, is whereby a conscious person does not make any distinction between species or castes, and knows that life force is present in everyone. When children understand this truth of life, we can shape them as responsible citizens of society who can live with integrity and compassion. (IANS)

Next Story

Manushi Chhillar Joins Hands with UNICEF to Promote Menstrual Hygiene

Manushi believes there still is silence and misinformation

0
Manushi Chhillar
Manushi is all set to promote the need to educate girls with all information on maintaining hygiene. Wikimedia Commons

Former Miss World and Bollywood debutant Manushi Chhillar has joined hands with Unicef to promote menstrual hygiene as she says there still is silence and misinformation.

On World Menstrual Hygiene Day on Thursday, Manushi will be promoting the need to educate girls with all information on maintaining hygiene, constructing adequate sanitation facilities and providing quick access to feminine hygiene products.

“Menstruation is still a taboo and we will have to work hard towards ensuring that every girl, every woman in every corner of our country is safe,” said Manushi, who has participated in the UNICEF global initiative called the Red Dot Challenge – a symbol adopted by the world body to depict menstrual cycle.

Manushi, who also runs her own initiative on menstrual hygiene called Project Shakti, said that every girl has the right to accurate information about her body.

“Every young girl has the right to accurate information about her body. Without the right information, girls often don’t know how to safely manage their period. There still is silence and misinformation. We have come a long way but a lot still needs to be done.

strip
“Without the right information, girls often don’t know how to safely manage their period.”, Manushi was quoted saying. Pixabay

“We all need to contribute towards raising awareness on this. I’m proud and honoured to be associated with UNICEF for this novel initiative that aims at debunking misinformation, taboos and also raise awareness on this critical issue.”

Also Read: NASA, SpaceX Postpone Historic Astronauts Launch Due to Bad Weather

Manushi is all set to make her Bollywood debut opposite superstar Akshay Kumar in the upcoming film “Prithviraj”.

Directed by Chandraprakash Dwivedi, “Prithviraj” is based on the life of king Prithviraj Chauhan. It stars Akshay as Prithviraj, while Manushi will play the role of the Sanyogita, the love of his life. (IANS)

Next Story

36% Consumers Would Like Devices to Offer Guidance on Environment: Report

36% consumers want guidance on environment from devices

0
consumers
36% consumers would prefer being guided on environment by devices. Pixabay

While nearly half of consumers worldwide see technological innovation as critical to tackling future environmental challenges, about 36 per cent would like their devices to offer guidance on leading a more environmentally conscious life, an Ericsson report said on Wednesday.

Interestingly, consumers who think technology will be crucial in solving future environmental challenges express almost twice the interest in various ICT solutions to help them live more environmentally consciously, compared to others, said the report “Consumers, sustainability and ICT”.

“ICT tools and services can play a significant part in assisting consumer’s daily efforts to reduce their personal environmental impact,” Zeynep Ahmet Vidal, Senior Researcher at Ericsson Consumer & IndustryLab and author of the report, said in a statement.

Consumers
Consumers who think technology will be crucial in solving future environmental challenges express almost twice the interest in various ICT solutions. Pixabay

The consumers do perceive ICT as helpful as an aid in their daily life, be it for environmental, health, cost or convenience-related reasons.

“But ICT also has the potential to enable future innovation in climate action, and here the service providers have a unique opportunity and position to provide novel solutions that can aid consumers in making more sustainable choices in daily life,” Vidal said.

The findings of Ericsson’s latest ConsumerLab report is based on a quantitative study of 12,000 Internet users from across the world.

The countries involved in the study include India, the US, Brazil, the UK, Germany, Spain, Russia, South Africa, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, China and Australia. The sample consists of 1,000 respondents from each country.

The report uncovers the current consumer mindset of leading environmentally sustainable lifestyles.

In the last two decades alone, concern about air and water pollution has risen from concerning one in five consumers, to almost one in two, the research showed.

While consideration for climate change and global warming has also risen from 13 per cent of consumers to 50 per cent.

mountains-consumers
Global warming has also risen from 13 per cent of consumers to 50 per cent. Pixabay

Also Read: Bullying a Common Factor Leading to LGBTQ Youth Suicides: Researchers

The study also includes consumers’ thoughts on where ultimate responsibility lies in mitigating environmental impact.

Globally, 8 in 10 consumers consider governments as being responsible for environmental protection.

While approximately 70 per cent consider that citizens should also be responsible, 5 in 10 expect companies and brands to uphold their share of the responsibility, said the report. (IANS)

Next Story

Bullying a Common Factor Leading to LGBTQ Youth Suicides: Researchers

LGBTQ youth are more likely to be bullied than non-LGBTQ youth

0
bullying
LGBTQ youth suicides are mainly caused because of bullying. Pixabay

Researchers have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who committed suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers.

For the findings, published in the journal ‘JAMA Pediatrics’, the research team reviewed nearly 10,000 death records of youth aged from 10 to 19 years who died by suicide in the US from 2003 to 2017.

While LGBTQ youth are more likely to be bullied and to report suicidal thoughts and behaviours than non-LGBTQ youth, this is believed to be the first study showing that bullying is a more common precursor to suicide among LGBTQ youth than among their peers.

bullying
bullying is a more common precursor to suicide among LGBTQ youth than among their peers. Pixabay

“We expected that bullying might be a more common factor, but we were surprised by the size of the disparity,” said study lead author Kirsty Clark from the Yale University.

“These findings strongly suggest that additional steps need to be taken to protect the LGBTQ youth — and others — against the insidious threat of bullying,” Clark added.

The research team used data from the National Violent Death Reporting System, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-led database that collects information on violent deaths, including suicides, from death certificates, law enforcement reports, and medical examiner and coroner records.

Death records in the database include narrative summaries from law enforcement reports and medical examiner and coroner records regarding the details of the youth’s suicide as reported by family or friends, the youth’s diary, social media posts, and text or email messages, as well as any suicide note.

Bullying
Among 10 to 13-year-olds, over two-thirds of LGBTQ youth’ death records mentioned that they had been bullied. Pixabay

The team searched these narratives for words and phrases that suggested whether the individual was LGBTQ. They followed a similar process to identify death records mentioning bullying. The study found that death records from LGBTQ youth were about five times more likely to mention bullying than non-LGBTQ youth’ death records.

Also Read: ICRA Expects Moderate Participation in Spectrum Auctions

Among 10 to 13-year-olds, over two-thirds of LGBTQ youth’ death records mentioned that they had been bullied.

Bullying is a major public health problem among the youth, and it is especially pronounced among the LGBTQ youth, said the researchers.

“By showing that bullying is also associated with the life itself for the LGBTQ youth, this study urgently calls for interventions that foster safety, belonging and esteem for all young people,” said study researcher John Pachankis. (IANS)