Monday December 9, 2019
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UAE Gets Help From An Indian Student, Develops Robot Cleaner For The State

"Recycling just one tonne of paper can save 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 380 gallons of oil, 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space and 4,000 kilowatts of energy"

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"The robot is autonomous and provides the facility for the optional switching of the ploughing system when required," he said. Pixabay

An Indian student has invented robots to help the United Arab Emirates (UAE) become greener, including a cleaner bot that preserves the marine environment and another that helps minimize human labour on farms, the media reported.

Sainath Manikandan, a student at the GEMS United Indian School here, built the Marine Robot Cleaner (MBot Cleaner) and Agriculture Robot (Agribot), and said he hopes that authorities would implement his inventions on a bigger scale, the Khaleej Times reported on Thursday.

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Last year, Manikandan collected nearly 2,500 kg of paper and 250 kg of plastics. Pixabay

His mission with the robots is to help protect marine species and the farmers who work in warmer countries like the UAE.

“MBot is a prototype robot that can remove floating wastes from surface water. It is basically shaped like a boat and can be operated remotely with a radio control. It runs with two motors that help the boat move in the water. Popsicle sticks are attached to a wheel and then to the third motor to push the waste from the water bodies into the storage basket,” he said.

The student added that by developing the MBot on a bigger scale, “we can try to preserve our marine species and environment”.

His AgriBot is a machine that is also powered by solar panels, instead of batteries.

Manikandan has suggested that drones be used along with this robot to assist and control the seed-planting process on farms.

“The purpose of AgriBot is to help the farmers in hot countries like the UAE. It is designed to minimize the labour of farmers, in addition to increasing the speed and accuracy of the work. It performs the elementary functions involved in farming, such as ploughing the field, sowing seeds, and covering the seeds with soil.

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His mission with the robots is to help protect marine species and the farmers who work in warmer countries like the UAE. Pixabay

“The robot is autonomous and provides the facility for the optional switching of the ploughing system when required,” he said.

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Last year, Manikandan collected nearly 2,500 kg of paper and 250 kg of plastics.

“Recycling just one tonne of paper can save 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 380 gallons of oil, 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space and 4,000 kilowatts of energy,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

Escalating Consequences of Climate Change Hit Countries Globally

India was ranked fifth vulnerable globally

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As Climate impacts begin to result in permanent loss and damage across the world, there is still no specific UN climate finance facility to reimburse the loss of land, culture and human lives. Pixabay

The escalating consequences of Climate change are now hitting both rich and poor countries, a report published on Wednesday said. India was ranked fifth vulnerable globally.

The Climate Risk Index 2020, an annual report by Germanwatch, ranks countries according to their vulnerability to extreme weather events.

It was released in the Spanish capital on the sidelines of the 25th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) or COP25 that is being held in the backdrop of climate impact biting globally.

According to the report, India has also been badly affected, ranking fifth in the overall global vulnerability index in 2018, ranked first in terms of fatalities and second in the world in terms of losses in millions of dollars.

India’s overall ranking has drastically fallen from 14th in 2017, to fifth in 2018.

The report shows that extreme weather, linked with climate change, is affecting not only the poorer countries like Myanmar and Haiti, but also some of the world’s richest countries.

Japan is the worst-hit country in 2018, while Germany and Canada were both also in the ‘bottom 10’ i.e. the most affected.

The results reflect the increasing damage caused by heatwaves, which scientists have found are being worsened by climate change.

To explain this drastic fall in ranking in a year, David Eckstein, Policy Advisor (Climate Finance and Investment) with Germanwatch said: “India’s high rank is due to severe rainfall, followed by heavy flooding and landslides that killed over 1,000 people.”

The state of Kerala was especially impacted. The floods were described as the worst in the last 100 years.

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A report shows that extreme weather, linked with climate change, is affecting not only the poorer countries like Myanmar and Haiti, but also some of the world’s richest countries. Pixabay

According to Eckstein, India was struck by two cyclones in October and November 2018 that also nearly killed 1,000 people. Last but not least, India also suffered from extreme heat. While the human death toll was kept considerably low due to public measures, the economic damage was quite severe.

Other countries ranking in the bottom 20 in the overall climate risk categories are the US at 12th, Vietnam at sixth, Bangladesh at seventh and France at 15th.

The report also points to the importance of negotiations at COP25. As climate impacts begin to result in permanent loss and damage across the world, there is still no specific UN climate finance facility to reimburse the loss of land, culture and human lives.

So far, the industrialised countries have refused to even negotiate it.

But at COP25, for the first time, financial support for climate-related loss and damage is high on the agenda.

For the poorest and most vulnerable countries, this climate summit is, therefore, of the utmost importance. They demand that states agree a deal to support those who are suffering, or at least acknowledge the necessity, with a pathway towards real help.

Otherwise the poorest countries will continue to rely on loans to cope with the consequences of climate change, which means they are threatened with excessive debts, undermining often already vulnerable economies.

In the talks that will last till December 13, India has been ambitious in its actions.

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The escalating consequences of Climate change are now hitting both rich and poor countries, a report published on Wednesday said. India was ranked fifth vulnerable globally. Pixabay

It has emphasised that developed countries should take the lead in undertaking ambitious actions and fulfil their climate finance commitments of mobilising $100 billion per annum by 2020 and progressively and substantially scale up their financial support to inform parties for future action through Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

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India is also stressing upon the need for fulfilling the pre-2020 commitments by developed countries, and that pre-2020 implementation gaps should not present an additional burden to developing countries in the post-2020 period.

The Indian delegation will be led by Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar, who is attending the summit from December 9. (IANS)