Monday January 27, 2020
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UAE Gets Help From An Indian Student, Develops Robot Cleaner For The State

"Recycling just one tonne of paper can save 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 380 gallons of oil, 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space and 4,000 kilowatts of energy"

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"The robot is autonomous and provides the facility for the optional switching of the ploughing system when required," he said. Pixabay

An Indian student has invented robots to help the United Arab Emirates (UAE) become greener, including a cleaner bot that preserves the marine environment and another that helps minimize human labour on farms, the media reported.

Sainath Manikandan, a student at the GEMS United Indian School here, built the Marine Robot Cleaner (MBot Cleaner) and Agriculture Robot (Agribot), and said he hopes that authorities would implement his inventions on a bigger scale, the Khaleej Times reported on Thursday.

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Last year, Manikandan collected nearly 2,500 kg of paper and 250 kg of plastics. Pixabay

His mission with the robots is to help protect marine species and the farmers who work in warmer countries like the UAE.

“MBot is a prototype robot that can remove floating wastes from surface water. It is basically shaped like a boat and can be operated remotely with a radio control. It runs with two motors that help the boat move in the water. Popsicle sticks are attached to a wheel and then to the third motor to push the waste from the water bodies into the storage basket,” he said.

The student added that by developing the MBot on a bigger scale, “we can try to preserve our marine species and environment”.

His AgriBot is a machine that is also powered by solar panels, instead of batteries.

Manikandan has suggested that drones be used along with this robot to assist and control the seed-planting process on farms.

“The purpose of AgriBot is to help the farmers in hot countries like the UAE. It is designed to minimize the labour of farmers, in addition to increasing the speed and accuracy of the work. It performs the elementary functions involved in farming, such as ploughing the field, sowing seeds, and covering the seeds with soil.

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His mission with the robots is to help protect marine species and the farmers who work in warmer countries like the UAE. Pixabay

“The robot is autonomous and provides the facility for the optional switching of the ploughing system when required,” he said.

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Last year, Manikandan collected nearly 2,500 kg of paper and 250 kg of plastics.

“Recycling just one tonne of paper can save 17 trees, 7,000 gallons of water, 380 gallons of oil, 3.3 cubic yards of landfill space and 4,000 kilowatts of energy,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why Automative Technology May Have Adverse Impact on Climate, Public Health

climate trade-off is much different on the regional scale, especially in areas with high vehicle densities

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Technology
While automative technology is credited with boosting fuel efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions, GDI engines produce more black carbon aerosols than traditional port fuel injection engines. Pixabay

New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts, a new study suggests.

The gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine is one of the most prominent technologies car manufacturers adopted to achieve the fuel economy and carbon dioxide emission goals established in 2012 by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

While this technology is credited with boosting fuel efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions, GDI engines produce more black carbon aerosols than traditional port fuel injection engines, according to the study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

“Even though emissions from gasoline vehicles constitute a small fraction of the black carbon in the atmosphere, the vehicle emissions are concentrated in regions with high population densities, which magnifies their effect,” said study researcher Rawad Saleh, Assistant Professor at University of Georgia in the US.

The market share of GDI-equipped vehicles increased from 2.3 per cent in model year 2008 to 51 per cent in model year 2018. The EPA projects 93 per cent of vehicles in the US will be equipped with GDI engines by 2025. According to the study, researchers predicts the increase in black carbon emissions from GDI-powered vehicles will fuel climate warming in urban areas of the US that significantly exceeds the cooling associated with a reduction in CO2.

In addition, they believe the shift will nearly double the premature mortality rate associated with vehicle emissions, from 855 deaths annually to 1,599. The researchers estimate the annual social cost of these premature deaths at $5.95 billion. The increase of black carbon is an unintended consequence of the shift to GDI-equipped vehicles that some scientists suspected was based on experimental data, according to the researcher.

Technology
New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts. Pixabay

“This study is the first to place these experimental findings in a complex modeling framework to investigate the trade-off between CO2 reduction and an increase in black carbon,” Slah said. While previous research has reported the shift to GDI engines will result in net benefits for the global climate, the researchers said that these benefits are rather small and can only be realized on timescales of decades.

Meanwhile, the negative impact of black carbon can be felt instantaneously, they added.

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“Our research shows the climate trade-off is much different on the regional scale, especially in areas with high vehicle densities. In these regions, the climate burden induced by the increase in black carbon dominates over the climate benefits of the reduction in CO2,” said Saleh. (IANS)