Tuesday June 18, 2019

Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

For the study, the researchers included 73,180 mothers

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The study showed that a child or teenager whose mother had gestational diabetes -- diabetes during pregnancy -- was nearly twice as likely to develop diabetes before the age of 22 years. Pixabay

Children and youths whose mothers had diabetes during their pregnancy are themselves at an increased risk of the disorder, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.

The study showed that a child or teenager whose mother had gestational diabetes — diabetes during pregnancy — was nearly twice as likely to develop diabetes before the age of 22 years.

The association was found in children from birth to the age of 22 years, from birth to 12 years, and from 12 to 22 years, said the study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Although Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes in parents are well-established risk factors for diabetes, we show that gestational diabetes mellitus may be a risk indicator for diabetes in the mother’s children before age 22,” said Kaberi Dasgupta, clinician-scientist from the McGill University in Canada.

“This link of diabetes in children and youth with gestational diabetes in the mother has the potential to stimulate clinicians, parents, and children and youth themselves to consider the possibility of diabetes if offspring of a mother with gestational diabetes mellitus develop signs and symptoms such as frequent urination, abnormal thirst, weight loss or fatigue,” said Dasgupta.

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According to World Health Organzation, diabetes can be treated and its consequences can be avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications.

For the study, the researchers included 73,180 mothers. (IANS)

Next Story

Study: Personal Care Products Lead to Life Threatening Situations in Young Children

These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent)

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personal care products
The study found that most injuries from these products occurred when a child swallowed the product (75.7 per cent) or the product made contact with a child's skin or eyes (19.3 per cent). Pixabay

Parents, take a note. Researchers have found that personal care products such as shampoo, lotion and nail polish in the hands of young children can quickly lead to poisoning or chemical burns-like life-threatening situations.

Published in Clinical Pediatrics journal, the study found that more than 64,600 children below five years of age, were treated for injuries related to personal care products between 2002 and 2016 in the US.

“Kids this age can’t read, so they don’t know what they are looking at. They see a bottle with a colourful label that looks or smells like something they are allowed to eat or drink, so they try to open it and take a swallow. When the bottle turns out to be nail polish remover instead of juice, or lotion instead of yoghurt, serious injuries can occur,” said the study co-author Rebecca McAdams from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in the US.

personal care products
These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent). Pixabay

The study found that most injuries from these products occurred when a child swallowed the product (75.7 per cent) or the product made contact with a child’s skin or eyes (19.3 per cent). These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent).

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According to the researchers, the top three product categories leading to injuries were nail care products (28.3 per cent), hair care products (27.0 per cent) and skin care products (25.0 per cent), followed by fragrance products (12.7 per cent).

“Since these products are often stored in easy-to-reach places and are not typically in child-resistant containers, it is easy for kids to reach and open the bottles,” McAdams said. (IANS)