Tuesday November 12, 2019
Home Life Style Health & Fitness  Study Claims...

 Study Claims, Men With A Diet Rich in Meat At Greater Risk of Death

The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition. 

0
//
food
"These findings should not be generalised to older people who are at a greater risk of malnutrition and whose intake of protein often remains below the recommended amount," said Heli Virtanen, a postdoctoral candidate from the University of Eastern Finland. Pixabay

Men with a diet rich in animal protein and meat such as sausages and cold cuts could be at a greater risk of death, finds a study.

The study found men who favoured animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a 23 per cent greater risk of death than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein.

diabetes
The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition. Pixabay

In addition, a high overall intake of dietary protein was associated with a greater risk of death in men who had been diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer.

However, a similar association was not found in men without these diseases, said the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

beef
The study found men who favoured animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a 23 per cent greater risk of death than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein. Pixabay

“These findings should not be generalised to older people who are at a greater risk of malnutrition and whose intake of protein often remains below the recommended amount,” said Heli Virtanen, a postdoctoral candidate from the University of Eastern Finland.

Also Read: Chinese Video Sharing App TikTok Continues Its Dramatic Rise in India

The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition.

For the study, the researchers included approximately 2,600 Finnish men aged between 42 and 60. (IANS)

Next Story

Study Reveals, Genetics Can Affect The Way in Which One Tastes Food

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019

0
Genetics
Genetics affect the way you taste, and taste is an important factor in food choice. Pixabay

Genetics make certain compounds taste bitter, which may make it harder for some people to add heart-healthy vegetables to their diet, according to a new study.

“Your genetics affect the way you taste, and taste is an important factor in food choice,” said study author Jennifer L. Smith from University of Kentucky.

According to the researchers, everyone inherits two copies of a taste gene called “TAS2R38”. People who inherit two copies of the variant called AVI aren’t sensitive to bitter tastes from certain chemicals.

Those with one copy of AVI and another called PAV perceive bitter tastes of these chemicals, however, individuals with two copies of PAV, often called ‘super-tasters,’ find the same foods exceptionally bitter.

“We’re talking a ruin-your-day level of bitter when they tasted the test compound. These people are likely to find broccoli, brussels sprouts and cabbage unpleasantly bitter; and they may also react negatively to dark chocolate, coffee and sometimes beer,” Smith said.

For the study, researchers analysed food-frequency questionnaires from 175 people (average age 52, more than 70 per cent female) and found that people with the PAV form of the gene were more than two and a half times as likely to rank in the bottom half of participants on the number of vegetables eaten.

Bitter-tasting status did not influence how much salt, fat or sugar the participants ate.

Genetics
Genetics make certain compounds taste bitter, which may make it harder for some people to add heart-healthy vegetables to their diet, according to a new study. Pixabay

“We thought they might take in more sugar and salt as flavour enhancers to offset the bitter taste of other foods, but that wasn’t the case,” Smith said.

“Down the road we hope we can use genetic information to figure out which vegetables people may be better able to accept and to find out which spices appeal to supertasters so we can make it easier for them to eat more vegetables,” Smith added.

ALSO READ: Ram Mandir To Be Built In Ayodhya By 2022

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia. (IANS)