Saturday November 23, 2019

Diet Soda May Keep Colon Cancer From Recurring: Researchers

Risk factors for colon cancer include obesity and poor diet

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The "soft drinks" were defined as caffeinated colas, caffeine-free colas and other carbonated beverages (such as diet ginger ale). Pixabay

People who drank diet soda after being treated for colon cancer are less likely to see a recurrence than those who didnt drink artificially-sweetened drinks, claims a Yale University study.

To reach this conclusion, researchers analysed 1,018 colon cancer patients.

Those who drank one or more 12-ounce artificially-sweetened drink a day saw a 46 per cent improvement in risk of cancer recurrence or death compared to those who didn’t drink such beverages, said the study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The “soft drinks” were defined as caffeinated colas, caffeine-free colas and other carbonated beverages (such as diet ginger ale).

“Artificially sweetened drinks have a checkered reputation in the public because of purported health risks that have never really been documented,” said Charles S. Fuchs from the Yale University in Connecticut.

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Artificially sweetened drinks have a checkered reputation in the public because of purported health risks that have never really been documented. Pixabaay

“Our study clearly shows they help avoid cancer recurrence and death in patients who have been treated for advanced colon cancer and that is an exciting finding,” Fuchs added.

The research follows similar findings that showed that drinking coffee and eating tree nuts also may have a protective effect, Fuchs noted.

While various studies have suggested that poor dietary habits, such as high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, may increase risk of colon cancer recurrence and patient mortality, “for colon cancer patients who have trouble abstaining from sweet beverages, choosing artificially sweetened options over sugar-sweetened beverages may allow them to avoid those health ramifications”, the researchers explained.

Also Read: Baking Soda Useful For beauty regime

Risk factors for colon cancer include obesity and poor diet.

“Concerns that artificial sweeteners may increase the incidence of obesity, diabetes, and cancer have been raised, but studies on issues such as weight gain and diabetes have been very mixed, and, regarding cancer, epidemiologic studies in humans have not demonstrated such relationships,” the study explained.

According to Fuchs, “in terms of colon cancer recurrence and survival, use of artificially-sweetened drinks is not a health risk, but is a healthier choice”. (IANS)

Next Story

Diet Soda Doesn’t Help Kids Cut Calories: Study

The study looked at data from over 7,000 children and teenagers, enrolled in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2011 to 2016

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The "soft drinks" were defined as caffeinated colas, caffeine-free colas and other carbonated beverages (such as diet ginger ale). Pixabay
Children and teenagers who consume low-calorie sweetened beverages take in more calories on a given day compared with those who drink water, says a study.
Teenagers who consumed diet beverages ended up having about the same number of calories as youth who consumed sugary beverages, the study said.
“These results challenge the utility of diet or low-calorie sweetened beverages when it comes to cutting calories and weight management,” said Allison Sylvetsky, Assistant Professor at the George Washington University and lead author of the study.
Soda, sugar-sweetened beverages in frame.
The study looked at data from over 7,000 children and teenagers, enrolled in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2011 to 2016.
Kids and teenagers reported what they ate and drank during a 24-hour period. The research team zeroed in on the reported consumption of sweetened beverages, those with low-calorie sweeteners and those with sugar.
Kids and teens who reported drinking low-calorie sweetened beverages, such as a diet soda, not only ingested extra calories compared with water drinkers, but also took in more calories from added sugars in foods and beverages, said the study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity. (IANS)