Monday November 18, 2019

Dietary Supplements Could Harm Your Health, Say Researchers

Supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building and energy were associated with almost three times the risk for severe medical outcomes compared to vitamins, said the study

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Supplements
Fish oil may not improve asthma symptoms: Study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that consumption of dietary supplements for weight loss, muscle building and energy leads to death, disability and hospitalisation in kids and young adults, compared to vitamins.

The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that these types of supplements were linked to nearly three times as many severe medical outcomes in young people.

“The FDA has issued countless warnings about supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building or sport performance, sexual function, and energy, and we know these products are widely marketed to and used by young people. So what are the consequences for their health? That’s the question we wanted to answer,” said lead author Flora Or from Harvard University.

mental health crisis, health messaging service
Dietary supplements could harm your health. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers looked at adverse event reports between January 2004 and April 2015 in the US and analysed the relative risk for severe medical events such as death, disability and hospitalisation in individuals aged zero and 25 years that were linked with the use of dietary supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building, or energy compared to vitamins.

They found that there were 977 single-supplement-related adverse event reports for the target age group. Of those, approximately 40 per cent involved severe medical outcomes, including death and hospitalisation.

Also Read- Researchers Design Tool that Customises Caffeine Intake for Alertness

Supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building and energy were associated with almost three times the risk for severe medical outcomes compared to vitamins, said the study.

“Many of these products have been found to be adulterated with prescription pharmaceuticals, banned substances, heavy metals, pesticides and other dangerous chemicals” said S. Bryn Austin, Professor at Harvard University. (IANS)

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Report Express Grieving Conditions for Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector

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Developing Countries
Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants, but their Condition is not good in Developing Countries. Wikimedia Commons

A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of sanitation workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk.

Sanitation workers everywhere occupy the lowest rung of society and are stigmatized and marginalized because they do the dirty work that other people do not want to do.

The report’s authors – the International Labor Organization, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and Water Aid – say they hope to raise awareness on the plight of sanitation workers and the dehumanizing conditions under which they are forced to work. For example, the report says that many sanitation workers aren’t given the safety training or equipment needed to protect them when handling effluent or fecal sludge.

World Health Organization spokesman Christian Lindmeier says sanitation workers make an important contribution to public health at the risk of their own lives. Poor sanitation, he says, causes more than 430,000 deaths from diarrhea every year and is linked to the spread of other diseases such as cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio.

“Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants.… Waste must be correctly treated before being disposed of or used. However, workers often come into direct contact with human waste, working with no equipment or no protection to remove it by hand which exposes them to a long list of health hazards and diseases,” Lindmeier said.

Developing Countries
A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk. VOA

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector. They labor under abusive conditions, have no rights or social protections and are poorly paid.

ALSO READ: WHO Demands Strict Regulations on Vaping Products

The study calls on countries to rectify these wrongs. It urges governments to enact laws and regulations that improve working conditions for sanitation workers and protect their safety and health. It says sanitation workers must be given the equipment and training necessary for the safe, proper disposal of waste. (VOA)