Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
The Realme 6 Pro can shoot videos at up to 4K, but only at 30fps and video shot also looked fine, with good stabilisation. (Representational Image). IANS

BY MD WAQUAR HAIDER

After creating a formidable space in the India smartphone market, Chinese smartphone manufacturer Realme is looking to disrupt the mid-price segment further, and has launched two smartphones — Realme 6 and 6 Pro — with the company’s own user interface based on Android 10 software.


The device has been priced at Rs. 16,999 for the 6GB RAM + 64GB storage variant, 6GB RAM + 128GB storage option is priced at Rs. 17,999 and the 8GB RAM + 128GB storage option comes for Rs 18,999.

The smartphone comes in two colours: Lightning Blue and Lightning Orange. Both the colours look good, but blue is the one we reviewed.
The phone is wrapped in Gorilla Glass 5, both on the front and back.

Let us see how it fares.


Chinese smartphone manufacturer Realme is looking to disrupt the mid-price segment further. Wikimedia Commons

Realme 6 Pro features a 6.6-inch LCD display with a dual hole-punch cutout, which gives the device a fresh look.

Watching videos and playing games on this Realme phone was good, thanks to the big AMOLED display with 90hz screen refresh rate and proper placement of front camera.

The power button is placed at the right side and has been flattened in order to accommodate a fingerprint sensor.

The SIM tray has slots for two nano-SIMs and a microSD card, along with volume rockers which are are placed on the left.

Meanwhile, the bottom edge of the phone has a single speaker, a USB-C port, as well as a headphone jack.

There is a quad rear camera setup that includes a 64MP Samsung GW1 primary sensor with an f/1.8 lens.

The camera setup also has an 8MP ultra-wide-angle shooter with an f/2.3 aperture, 12MP telephoto shooter with an f/2.5 aperture, and a 2MP macro shooter with an f/2.4 aperture.

The combination of sensors captured decent photos — pretty good via an under Rs 20,000 smartphone.

At night, we found the primary camera excellent in artificial lights. Night Mode was surprisingly effective and helped balance the brightness.


Realme 6 Pro features a 6.6-inch LCD display with a dual hole-punch cutout, which gives the device a fresh look. (Representational Image). Wikimedia Commons

For selfies and video chat, the Realme 6 Pro comes with the dual hole-punch selfie camera setup that consists of a 16MP Sony IMX471 primary sensor with an f/2.0 lens and an 8MP secondary sensor with an ultra-wide-angle f/2.2 lens that has a field-of-view (FoV) of 105 degrees.

The front camera is fairly good — in daytime as well as at night — with proper detailing and portrait shots had nicely blurred backgrounds.

The Realme 6 Pro can shoot videos at up to 4K, but only at 30fps and video shot also looked fine, with good stabilisation.

The phone packs Octa-core Snapdragon 720G SoC, along with Adreno 618 GPU and up to 8GB of LPDDR4x dual-channel RAM.

Since Snapdragon 720G SoC is a newer chip, it also has new features such as support for Bluetooth 5.1, NavIC satellite navigation, and a more power-efficient Sensing Hub.

The device was powerful enough to handle anything from basic calls to heavy gaming without any trouble. Apart from PUBG, we also played ‘Call of Duty’ on high settings without any lag.

Additionally, the device runs Android 10 OS and the OS has Realme UI customization over it.

Also Read- Vivo Unveils Third Generation Concept Smartphone ‘APEX 2020’

The 4,300 mAh battery capacity on the Realme 6 Pro is pretty standard.
The device also has 30W fast VOOC 4.0 fast charging.

Conclusion: With good camera and best-in-class performance, Realme 6 Pro is one of the best smartphones in mid-price segment and a tough challenger for Redmi Note 9 Pro and Note 9 Pro Max. (IANS)


Popular

Unsplash

Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal.

"In India, to be born as a man is a crime, to question a woman is an atrocious crime, and this all because of those women who keep suppressing men in the name of feminism."

Feminism, a worldwide movement that started to establish, define and defend equal rights for women in all sections- economically, politically, and socially. India, being a patriarchal society gives a gender advantage to the men in the society thus, Indian feminists sought to fight against the culture-specific issue for women in India. Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal. It states nowhere that women should get more wages than men, that women deserve more respect than men, that's pseudo-feminism.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Yakshi statue by Kanayi Kunjiraman at Malampuzha garden, Kerala

Kerala is a land of many good things. It has an abundance of nature, culture, art, and food. It is also a place of legend and myth, and is known for its popular folklore, the legend of Yakshi. This is not a popular tale outside the state, but it is common knowledge for travellers, especially those who fare through forests at night.

The legend of the yakshi is believed to be India's equivalent of the Romanian Dracula, except of course, the Yakshi is a female. Many Malayalis believe that the Yakshi wears a white saree and had long hair. She has a particular fragrance, which is believed to be the fragrance of the Indian devil-tree flowers. She seduces travellers with her beauty, and kills them brutally.

Keep Reading Show less
Pinterest

Ancient India not only made mentions of homosexuality but accepted it as well.


The LGBTQ+ acronym stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and others. In India LGBTQ+ community also include a specific social group, part religious cult, and part caste: the Hijras. They are culturally defined either as "neither men nor women" or as men who become women by adopting women's dress and behavior. Section 377 of the India Penal code that criminalized all sexual acts "against the order of nature" i.e. engaging in oral sex or anal sex along with other homosexual activities were against the law, ripping homosexual people off of their basic human rights. Thus, the Indian Supreme Court ruled a portion of Section 377 unconstitutional on 6th September 2018.

Keep reading... Show less