Sunday February 17, 2019

Diversity in cuisines is good for development, says a chef

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British chef, Adam Simmonds, says adopting varieties in cuisines is for the betterment for the country
Diversity in cuisines is good for development, says a chef. wikimedia commons

New Delhi, Dec 28, 2017: Chinese, Indian and Spanish dishes are welcomed with open arms in the UK, says British chef Adam Simmonds, who also believes that having a diverse cuisine is good for the development of a country.

Asked which cuisine is most popular in London, Simmonds told IANS here: “It has become so diverse now. In London, it is so multicultural. There are so many amazing Chinese, Japanese, Indian and Spanish cuisines available. They are just growing massively. The UK as a whole, and not just London, has some of the best cooking in the world for sure.”

“It is only enhancing the UK as a Mecca for food. Every country needs to develop and to have different cuisines… the whole thing is brilliant,” he added.

The owner of The Test Kitchen, which is a pop-up located in Soho, London, was here for the launch of Gurugram-based delivery-cum-dine-in kitchen concept — The Trial. It is a blend of chefs, entrepreneurs and innovative food concepts.

“What I am trying to do back home is to try to bring interaction from the restaurant into the kitchen. There are no barriers. It’s about engaging the customer more within the cooking,” he said.

And that’s what he is trying to do at The Trial.

“There are three types of chefs here. If the concept fits, one of us will work on it,” said the chef, who enjoys cooking Scandinavian food.

“It is a concept that I believe in. So, I thought it was a great project to be involved with. Indians are travelling more. They go abroad a lot. They like the style of food; so why can’t something like that work in this country?”

After his maiden visit to India earlier this month, he hopes to return to the country soon and learn more about the indigenous spices.

“I would like to learn how to work with spices properly and to understand it. In my next trip, I would like to see some grassroot stuff to help me understand more about the culture and food,” said the chef, who has been to The Maldives, Denmark, France, Spain and Netherlands.

Simmonds believes there is a “skill-set” in cooking .

And there’s a “great skill level in cooking fish” which is why he likes to prepare dishes with fish as the star ingredient.

He is also a fan of food that is very light and not too robust.

“With the lightness, you get to know all the flavours. If there are just two to three items on the plate, you can showcase your skill set. You can’t hide behind the flavours. It’s about making it clean and vibrant,” said the former head chef of Ynyshir Hall, which won a Michelin Star in 2006.

But it’s not easy being a chef.

“There are long working hours, it’s stressful and you are criticised. You are constantly judged on each and every dish. People think they know more. It is quite difficult sometimes, but you have to accept it,” said Simmonds.

“If you do crack it and enjoy it, it’s the best industry to be in,” he added. (IANS)

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Stop “Stereotyping” Northeast, States Hold Strong Cultural Harmony

Anungla Longumer, a writer-musician from Nagaland, explained how her state that has 14 different tribes, has massive ethnic diversities but comes together with a "common cultural ethos".

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Northeast is filled with diversities, shouldn't be stereotyped,pixabay

Writers and intellectuals from the northeast have said that the region is full of ethnic and linguistic diversity and urged the rest of the country to stop “stereotyping” the people living there as peripheral.

Noting that the northeastern states have a  but are marred by political conflicts, they claimed that the region can become “a great force” if the political ideologies match.

“The people of northeast are evolving while people from the rest of the country have a fixed image about us as a whole. Such stereotyping is often disturbing. People just lump us together and term all of us as the ‘northeasterns’,” Anjulika Samom, an independent journalist from Manipur said during a session at the Tata Steel Kolkata Literary Meet 2019 here.

north east India

Noting that the northeastern states have a  but are marred by political conflicts, they claimed that the region can become “a great force” if the political ideologies match.

Explaining the centre-periphery concept about the states, Dolly Kikon, a social anthropologist from Nagaland, said the region is conceived as peripheral due to policies made by the Central government and said such concepts should be questioned.

“The centre-periphery thing has its origin in the securitisation of the region and also the kind of policy that are made in Delhi. It has been built using a very colonial framework of remoteness. I think we need to question that,” she said.

Echoing her, Samom claimed that for the people living in those states, their habitat is the centre of their universe, while the other parts of the nation become peripheral.

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Echoing her, Samom claimed that for the people living in those states, their habitat is the centre of their universe, while the other parts of the nation become peripheral. pixabay

Also Read: Great Potential For Books In India: International Bestselling Authors

Anungla Longumer, a writer-musician from Nagaland, explained how her state that has 14 different tribes, has massive ethnic diversities but comes together with a “common cultural ethos”.

“On the ground we are very tolerant about our diversity. We identify and relate with each other. There are a lot of political conflicts in the region due to the ethnical diversity but at the ground level people are bound by a strong cultural ethos. The region can become a considerable force if it can come together in terms of common political ideologies,” she added. (IANS)