Monday April 22, 2019

Do Dogs have “Episodic Memory” ? Dogs Pay Attention to What you Say and Do and they’ll Remember too: Study

For the study, the team first trained 17 dogs to imitate human actions with the “Do as I Do” training method

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Dogs, Pixabay

London, November 24, 2016: For all dog owners out there, your canine friends are paying attention to what you say and do and they’ll remember too.

A new study has suggested that just like humans, dogs too have “episodic memory” — the ability to remember and recall events from the past.

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The study revealed that dogs can recall a person’s complex actions even when they don’t expect to have their memory tested.

[bctt tweet=”Just like humans, dogs too have “episodic memory” — the ability to remember and recall events from the past.” username=””]

“The results of our study can be considered as a further step to break down artificially erected barriers between animals and humans,” said Claudia Fugazza from Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

For the study, the team first trained 17 dogs to imitate human actions with the “Do as I Do” training method, in which dogs watch a person perform an action and then do the action themselves.

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For example, if their owner jumps in the air and then gives the “Do it!” command, the dog would jump in the air too.

Next, the dogs were trained to lie down after watching the human action, no matter what it was.

After the dogs had learned to lie down reliably, the researchers surprised them by saying “Do It” and the dogs did.

The dogs were then tested in that way after one minute and after one hour.

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The results showed they were able to recall the demonstrated actions after both short and long time intervals. However, their memory faded somewhat over time, the researchers observed.

The same approach can most likely be used and adapted in a wide range of animal species, to better understand how animals’ minds process their own actions and that of others around them, the researchers noted, in the study published in the journal Current Biology. (IANS)

  • Ruchika Kumari

    dogs are Human’s best friend…..and they are very intelligent too

Next Story

Dogs can Sniff out Cancer in Blood with 97% Accuracy, Says Study

The results will be presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology annual meeting in Florida

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doctors, blood cancer
Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans', making them highly sensitive to odours we can not perceive. Pixabay

Your canine friend, dog uses its highly evolved sense of smell to pick out blood samples from people with cancer with almost 97 per cent accuracy, a finding that can lead to new low-cost and non-invasive screening approaches for the disease, finds a study.

Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans’, making them highly sensitive to odours we can not perceive.

“Although there is no cure for cancer, early detection offers the best hope,” said lead researcher Heather Junqueira, at BioScentDx, a US-based healthcare company. “A highly sensitive test for detecting cancer could save thousands of lives and change the way the disease is treated,” he said.

For the study, the team used a form of clicker training to teach four beagles to distinguish between normal blood serum and samples from patients with malignant lung cancer.

The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

Although one beagle — aptly named Snuggles — was unmotivated to perform, the other three correctly identified lung cancer samples 96.7 per cent times and normal samples 97.5 per cent times.

“This work is very exciting because it paves the way for further research along two paths, both of which could lead to new cancer-detection tools,” said Junqueira.

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“One is using canine scent detection as a screening method for cancers, and the other would be to determine the biologic compounds the dogs detect and then design cancer-screening tests based on those compounds,” he said.

The results will be presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology annual meeting in Florida. The team plans to use canine scent detection to develop a non-invasive way of screening for cancer and other life-threatening diseases. (IANS)