Friday August 23, 2019

Do you have a desk-bound Job? Beware!

Your desk-bound job may be putting you at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, cholesterol and obesity problems and much more

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office workers, pixabay

London, March 2, 2017: Do you have a desk-bound job? Beware, you may be at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases by 0.2 per cent and an increase in waist circumference by two cm, for every additional hour of sitting on top of five hours, researchers warned.

The findings showed that those who had desk jobs had a bigger waist circumference — 97 cm compared to 94 cm in people without desk jobs. They also had approximately one body mass index (BMI) unit difference.

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Further, they had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease — 2.2 per cent compared to 1.6 per cent in people without desk jobs, over ten years.

In addition, each extra hour of sitting from five hours a day, increased the levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and decreased good cholesterol (HDL).

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“Longer time spent in sedentary posture is significantly associated with larger waist circumference, higher triglycerides (fat in the blood) and lower HDL cholesterol, all adding up to worse risk of heart disease,” said William Tigbe from University of Warwick in Britain.

In contrast, walking more than 15,000 steps per day, which is equivalent to walking seven to eight miles, or spending seven hours per day upright, may be associated with zero risk factors, Tigbe added, in the paper published in the International Journal of Obesity.

Although the study could be used as the basis of new public health targets for sitting, lying, standing and stepping to avoid metabolic risks, it would be very challenging to achieve unless incorporated into people’s occupations.

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“Our evolution, to become the human species, did not equip us well to spending all day sitting down. We probably adapted to be healthiest spending seven to eight hours every day on our feet, as hunters or gatherers,” said Mike Lean Professor at the University of Glasgow. (IANS)

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Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

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obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)