Thursday January 18, 2018

Do you have a desk-bound Job? Beware!

Your desk-bound job may be putting you at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, cholesterol and obesity problems and much more

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London, March 2, 2017: Do you have a desk-bound job? Beware, you may be at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases by 0.2 per cent and an increase in waist circumference by two cm, for every additional hour of sitting on top of five hours, researchers warned.

The findings showed that those who had desk jobs had a bigger waist circumference — 97 cm compared to 94 cm in people without desk jobs. They also had approximately one body mass index (BMI) unit difference.

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Further, they had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease — 2.2 per cent compared to 1.6 per cent in people without desk jobs, over ten years.

In addition, each extra hour of sitting from five hours a day, increased the levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and decreased good cholesterol (HDL).

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“Longer time spent in sedentary posture is significantly associated with larger waist circumference, higher triglycerides (fat in the blood) and lower HDL cholesterol, all adding up to worse risk of heart disease,” said William Tigbe from University of Warwick in Britain.

In contrast, walking more than 15,000 steps per day, which is equivalent to walking seven to eight miles, or spending seven hours per day upright, may be associated with zero risk factors, Tigbe added, in the paper published in the International Journal of Obesity.

Although the study could be used as the basis of new public health targets for sitting, lying, standing and stepping to avoid metabolic risks, it would be very challenging to achieve unless incorporated into people’s occupations.

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“Our evolution, to become the human species, did not equip us well to spending all day sitting down. We probably adapted to be healthiest spending seven to eight hours every day on our feet, as hunters or gatherers,” said Mike Lean Professor at the University of Glasgow. (IANS)

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New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test

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New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test
New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test. wikimedia commons

New York, Jan 3, 2018: A new method of calculating so-called “bad cholesterol” levels has the potential to do away with the need to fast before blood is drawn for such screening, say researchers.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, suggests that the new method is more accurate than an older method in people who did not fast before the cholesterol test.

The new method for calculating LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, was developed by Seth Martin and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US.

“Although the new LDL calculation method is a bit more complex, the beauty is that it can be performed using information that is already collected in the blood sample for the standard lipid profile and automated in the lab’s computer system to give a more accurate result,” Martin said.

“Since nonfasting samples are now accurate, it’s more convenient for patients because they can come in anytime and don’t need to return for a second appointment if they have eaten,” Martin added.

For the study, the researchers compared the accuracy of the new LDL calculation method with the Friedewald method, developed in the late 1970s when patients fasted or did not fast.

The Friedewald method was earlier shown by Martin and colleagues to underestimate LDL cholesterol levels, particularly in people with high triglycerides.

Triglycerides are fatty acids that tend to be higher in people with obesity and diabetes and that increase after eating.

The physicians did their comparison using data already gathered in a clinical repository.

In their final analysis, the researchers found that approximately 30 per cent of the nonfasting participants had greater than 10 milligrams per decilitre inaccurate cholesterol measurements using the Friedewald method compared with only three per cent error from the actual measured value with the new method.

The new test does not take any longer to provide results to physicians and patients, and the cost is the same to administer, the study said. (IANS)

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