Thursday July 19, 2018

Owning a Dog may help Older Adults to be more Active: Study

The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking

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Owning a dog may help older adults meet physical activity levels. Wikimedia
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  • The study highlighted that pet ownership may help older people achieve higher levels of physical activity
  • The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking
  • Dog owners had fewer sedentary events in compared to non-dog owners

London June 9, 2017: Owning a dog may help older adults meet physical activity levels recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) of at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, researchers suggest.

The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking, taking an extra 2,760 steps per day when compared to people who didn’t own a dog.

“Over the course of a week this additional time spent walking may in itself be sufficient to meet WHO recommendations of at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity,” said lead author Philippa Dall, doctoral student at Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland.

Further, dog owners had fewer sedentary events — continuous periods of sitting down — than non-dog owners.

“Our results indicate that dog ownership may play an important role in encouraging older adults to walk more,” added Nancy Gee from WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition — a Britain-based research organisation.

For the study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, the team used data on patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in 43 dog owners and 43 controls, aged 65 years and over.

The researchers monitored the time spent walking moderately, time spent standing, total time spent sitting, as well as the number of times people sat down and how long they sat down for.

The study highlighted that pet ownership may help older people achieve higher levels of physical activity or maintain their physical activity levels for a longer period of time, which could improve their prospects for a better quality of life, improved or maintained cognition, and perhaps, even overall longevity. (IANS)

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Study Shows, Dogs of 8 Weeks of Age are Found Most Attractive by Humans

Dogs occupy a special place in our hearts, but there is a time when we find man's best friend most attractive -- at roughly eight weeks, the same point in time at which their mother weans them and leaves them to fend for themselves, a study says.

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The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

Dogs occupy a special place in our hearts, but there is a time when we find man’s best friend most attractive — at roughly eight weeks, the same point in time at which their mother weans them and leaves them to fend for themselves, a study says.

The researchers wanted to find out if there was a connection between pups’ weaning age — when they are at their most vulnerable — and their level of attractiveness to humans.

“There is indeed an optimal age of maximum cuteness, and that age does line up pretty closely with the age at which mothers wean their pups,” said lead researcher Clive Wynne, Professor at Arizona State University in the US.

 

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.
representational image. pixabay

 

The researchers believe that the findings, published in Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Interactions of People and Animals, could provide insight into the depth and origin of the relationship between humans and dogs.

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.

The participants were asked to rank the puppies’ level of attractiveness in each photo. Three distinctive looking breeds were ranked — Jack Russell terriers, cane corsos and white shepherds.

The study was carried out using a series of photographs of puppies at different ages, from the first weeks of life through young adulthood.
Dog Owner. Pixabay

Also Read: Taking Your Dog For A Walk Can Help Older Adults Live Longer

The results showed that the pups’ attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.

“Around seven or eight weeks of age, just as their mother is getting sick of them and is going to kick them out of the den and they’re going to have to make their own way in life, at that age, that is exactly when they are most attractive to human beings,” Wynne said. (IANS)