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Domestic Violence charges keeping NRI men away from their families in India

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NRI men are increasingly finding themselves being falsely implicated in domestic violence charges and are thus being forced to stay away from their family and country to prevent getting arrested.

Consider the troubles being faced by the septuagenarian couple Kamaljeet Singh and his wife. They have not met their son for the last seven years, after he was charged with non-bailable 498A (Protection of Women Against Domestic Violence Act) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) and his lawyers advised him to stay in Canada and not to return to India to avoid arrest.

The couple insists that their son is innocent and the case is false. But, they are yet to find any relief for their troubles. At an age when everyone prefers to be in proximity of their sons and daughters, the couple is forced to fight the legal battle alone.

Many NRIs who become implicated in domestic violence charges choose not to fight the case to avoid being stuck in a legal battle that may cause scandal and public humiliation, loss of job, huge financial burden, etc. They are also legally advised not to return back to India to avoid being arrested.

But, many legal experts believe that, though they may avoid getting arrested by not returning to India, their decision to not fight the case may further complicate the matter.

One of the greatest hurdle NRIs face in fighting the legal battle is regarding access to documents. This hinders their ability to properly prepare and present their case in the court. Another issue is the huge financial expenditure that is incurred in legal proceedings and frequent travel. Experts believe that if documents are made available online, then it would go a long away in helping these NRIs to present their case in a better way.

 

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Kids More Prone To Miss School When Mothers Face Domestic Violence, Reveals Study

Children of women who experience high physical violence and injuries - with or without sexual violence- are at greater risk of school disruption

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The study found that women in both the High Physical and Sexual Violence and Injuries class and the High Physical and Low Sexual Violence and Injuries class were at greater risk of IPV disrupting children's school attendance than the women in the Low Physical and Sexual Violence class. Pixabay

Children are prone to miss school more when their mothers experience high physical violence, according to a new study.

Published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal, the research found that 23.3 per cent of women who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) reported their child’s school attendance was disrupted due to IPV.

“Our analysis allows us to identify patterns of IPV experience, such as those who experience more physical violence and injuries, and determine how these different patterns of IPV affect disruptions in school attendance,” said study researcher Anna M. Scolese from George Mason University in the US.

The study used baseline data from a sub-sample of 659 women in Mexico City who recently experienced IPV and reported having a child under age 18.

Researchers identified four distinct classes of IPV experiences: Low physical and sexual violence; low physical and high sexual violence, high physical and low sexual violence and injuries; and high physical and sexual violence and injuries.

Boys, Kids, Children, Happy, Sitting, Siblings
Children are prone to miss school more when their mothers experience high physical violence, according to a new study. Pixabay

The study found that women in both the High Physical and Sexual Violence and Injuries class and the High Physical and Low Sexual Violence and Injuries class were at greater risk of IPV disrupting children’s school attendance than the women in the Low Physical and Sexual Violence class.

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“Our results show that children of women who experience high physical violence and injuries – with or without sexual violence- are at greater risk of school disruption. In short, if a mother experiences high physical violence and injuries from intimate partner violence, this is more likely to affect a child’s school attendance,” Scolese said. (IANS)